Working in high school and adaptation in the transition to young adulthood among African American youth

José A. Bauermeister, Marc A. Zimmerman, Tracey Elaine Barnett, Cleopatra Howard Caldwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Researchers have found mixed support for documenting whether work is protective or harmful during adolescence. This study examined the association between work and problem behaviors among African American youth (N = 592; 53% female; M = 14.8 years, SD = .60) followed from mid-adolescence to young adulthood over eight Waves (90% response rate over the first four Waves and a 68% response rate across all eight Waves). We explored three competing operationalizations of work: work history (never worked, worked), work intensity (no work, 20 h or less, and 21 h or over), and work trajectories (never worked, episodic work, stopped working, late starter, and consistent worker). Non-working youth reported higher marijuana use during young adulthood than their working counterparts. Nonworkers reported lower self-acceptance during young adulthood than those working greater number of hours per week. Differences in work trajectories for cigarette use, depression, and anxiety during adolescence imply that when and for how long youth work are also important factors to explore. Our findings lend tentative support to the work benefits perspective and suggest that the association between work and problem behaviors may depend on the work measure used. We discuss the implications of employing different work measures in adolescent research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)877-890
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2007

Fingerprint

African Americans
adulthood
school
adolescence
American
youth work
operationalization
Cannabis
Tobacco Products
acceptance
Anxiety
anxiety
Research Personnel
adolescent
worker
Depression

Keywords

  • Adolescent development
  • African American
  • Employment
  • Externalizing behavior
  • Mental health
  • Work transitions

Cite this

Bauermeister, José A. ; Zimmerman, Marc A. ; Barnett, Tracey Elaine ; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard. / Working in high school and adaptation in the transition to young adulthood among African American youth. In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence. 2007 ; Vol. 36, No. 7. pp. 877-890.
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Working in high school and adaptation in the transition to young adulthood among African American youth. / Bauermeister, José A.; Zimmerman, Marc A.; Barnett, Tracey Elaine; Caldwell, Cleopatra Howard.

In: Journal of Youth and Adolescence, Vol. 36, No. 7, 01.10.2007, p. 877-890.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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