Vascular risk profile and white matter hyperintensity volume among Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic Whites: The HABLE study

for the HABLE Study Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: Among vascular risk factors we hypothesized that an increased prevalence of diabetes in Hispanics would be associated with greater white matter hyperintensity (WMH) volume, which may contribute to cognitive decline. Methods: A total of 1318 participants (60% female; 49% Hispanic, 51% non-Hispanic White; age 66.2 ± 8.9 years) underwent clinical evaluation and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). WMH volume associations were assessed with age, sex, and ethnicity and then with vascular risk factors in a selective regression model. Results: WMH volume was greater with older age (P <.0001), Hispanic ethnicity (P =.02), and female sex (P =.049). WMH volume was best predicted by age, diastolic blood pressure, hypertension history, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), white blood cell count, and hematocrit (P <.01 for all). Elevated HbA1c was associated with greater WMH volume among Hispanics (parameter estimate 0.08 ± 0.02, P <.0001) but not non-Hispanic Whites (parameter estimate 0.02 ± 0.04, P =.5). Discussion: WMH volume was greater in Hispanics, which may be partly explained by increased WMH volume related to elevated HbA1c among Hispanics but not non-Hispanic Whites.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere12263
JournalAlzheimer's and Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment and Disease Monitoring
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • cerebral microvascular disease
  • diabetes
  • Hispanic
  • leukoaraiosis
  • white matter hyperintensity

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