Using fractional anisotropy imaging to detect mild cognitive impairment and alzheimer's disease among mexican americans and non-hispanic whites: A HABLE Study

James R. Hall, Leigh A. Johnson, Fan Zhang, Melissa Petersen, Arthur W. Toga, Yonggang Shi, David Mason, Robert A. Rissman, Kristine Yaffe, Sid E. O'Bryant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most frequently occurring neurodegenerative disease; however, little work has been conducted examining biomarkers of AD among Mexican Americans. Here, we examined diffusion tensor MRI marker profiles for detecting mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia in a multi-ethnic cohort. Methods: 3T MRI measures of fractional anisotropy (FA) were examined among 1,636 participants of the ongoing community-based Health & Aging Brain among Latino Elders (HABLE) community-based study (Mexican American n = 851; non-Hispanic white n = 785). Results: The FA profile was highly accurate in detecting both MCI (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.99) and dementia (AUC = 0.98). However, the FA profile varied significantly not only between diagnostic groups but also between Mexican Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Conclusion: Findings suggest that diffusion tensor imaging markers may have a role in the neurodiagnostic process for detecting MCI and dementia among diverse populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)266-273
Number of pages8
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume50
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Diffusion tensor imaging
  • Fractional anisotropy
  • Mexican American
  • Mild cognitive impairment

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