Tolerance to N6-(l-phenylisopropyl) adenosine Contribution of behavioral mechanisms and cross-tolerance profile

D. G. Spencer, P. Caldwell, Michael Oglesby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The contribution of behavioral mechanisms to tolerance to N6-(l-rmphenylisopropyl)adenosine (l-PIA) was studied, along with the degree of cross-tolerance to other drugs active in the CNS. Rats were stabilized on a fixed-ratio of a 20 lever-pressing schedule for food reward and were then assigned to three daily-treatment groups. One group (saline-behavior associated) was injected with saline 15 min before the session, another (l-PIA-behavior associated) was injected with l-PIA (0.08 mg/kg) 15 min before the session and the last (l-PIA-behavior dissociated) was injected with l-PIA (0.08 mg/kg) immediately after the session. Tolerance developed to the decreasing effects of l-PIA on response rate in both groups, l-PIA-behavior associated and l-PIA-behavior dissociated. Behavioral mechanisms were thus not important in tolerance to l-PIA. In subsequent cross-tolerance tests, l-PIA-tolerant rats were crosstolerant to the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclohexyladenosine. The drugs 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), diazepam, pentobarbital, ketamine, clonidine, d-amphetamine and caffeine did not produce differential effects in l-PIA-tolerant and non-tolerant subjects; however, l-PIA-tolerant subjects were more sensitive to the suppressive effects of chlorpromazine on the response-rate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)671-676
Number of pages6
JournalNeuropharmacology
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1984

Fingerprint

Adenosine
Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonists
Dextroamphetamine
Chlorpromazine
Ketamine
Clonidine
Pentobarbital
Diazepam
Caffeine
Reward
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Appointments and Schedules
Food

Keywords

  • N6-(l-phenylisopropyl)adenosine
  • N6-cyclohexyl adenosine
  • PIA
  • behavior
  • rats
  • tolerance

Cite this

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title = "Tolerance to N6-(l-phenylisopropyl) adenosine Contribution of behavioral mechanisms and cross-tolerance profile",
abstract = "The contribution of behavioral mechanisms to tolerance to N6-(l-rmphenylisopropyl)adenosine (l-PIA) was studied, along with the degree of cross-tolerance to other drugs active in the CNS. Rats were stabilized on a fixed-ratio of a 20 lever-pressing schedule for food reward and were then assigned to three daily-treatment groups. One group (saline-behavior associated) was injected with saline 15 min before the session, another (l-PIA-behavior associated) was injected with l-PIA (0.08 mg/kg) 15 min before the session and the last (l-PIA-behavior dissociated) was injected with l-PIA (0.08 mg/kg) immediately after the session. Tolerance developed to the decreasing effects of l-PIA on response rate in both groups, l-PIA-behavior associated and l-PIA-behavior dissociated. Behavioral mechanisms were thus not important in tolerance to l-PIA. In subsequent cross-tolerance tests, l-PIA-tolerant rats were crosstolerant to the adenosine A1 receptor agonist, N6-cyclohexyladenosine. The drugs 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP), diazepam, pentobarbital, ketamine, clonidine, d-amphetamine and caffeine did not produce differential effects in l-PIA-tolerant and non-tolerant subjects; however, l-PIA-tolerant subjects were more sensitive to the suppressive effects of chlorpromazine on the response-rate.",
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Tolerance to N6-(l-phenylisopropyl) adenosine Contribution of behavioral mechanisms and cross-tolerance profile. / Spencer, D. G.; Caldwell, P.; Oglesby, Michael.

In: Neuropharmacology, Vol. 23, No. 6, 01.01.1984, p. 671-676.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Tolerance to N6-(l-phenylisopropyl) adenosine Contribution of behavioral mechanisms and cross-tolerance profile

AU - Spencer, D. G.

AU - Caldwell, P.

AU - Oglesby, Michael

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