They drink how much and where? Normative perceptions by drinking contexts and their association to college students' alcohol consumption

Melissa Ardelle Lewis, Dana Michelle Litt, Jessica A. Blayney, Ty W. Lostutter, Hollie Granato, Jason R. Kilmer, Christine M. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Prior research has shown that normative perceptions of others' drinking behavior strongly relates to one's own drinking behavior. Most research examining the perceived drinking of others has generally focused on specificity of the normative referent (i.e., gender, ethnicity). The present study expands the research literature on social norms by examining normative perceptions by various drinking contexts. Specifically, this research aimed to determine if college students overestimate peer drinking by several drinking contexts (i.e., bar, fraternity/sorority party, non-fraternity/sorority party, sporting event) and to examine whether normative perceptions for drinking by contexts relate to one's own drinking behavior specific to these contexts. Method: Students (N = 1,468; 56.4% female) participated in a web-based survey by completing measures assessing drinking behavior and perceived descriptive drinking norms for various contexts. Results: Findings demonstrated that students consistently overestimated the drinking behavior for the typical same-sex student in various drinking contexts, with the most prominent being fraternity/sorority parties. In addition, results indicated that same-sex normative perceptions for drinking by contexts were associated with personal drinking behavior within these contexts. Conclusions: Results stress the importance of specificity of social norms beyond those related to the normative referent. Clinical implications are discussed in terms of preventions and intervention efforts as well as risks associated with drinking in a novel context.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)844-853
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs
Volume72
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2011

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alcohol consumption
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Alcohols
Students
fraternity
student
Social Norms
Research
ethnicity
event
gender

Cite this

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title = "They drink how much and where? Normative perceptions by drinking contexts and their association to college students' alcohol consumption",
abstract = "Objective: Prior research has shown that normative perceptions of others' drinking behavior strongly relates to one's own drinking behavior. Most research examining the perceived drinking of others has generally focused on specificity of the normative referent (i.e., gender, ethnicity). The present study expands the research literature on social norms by examining normative perceptions by various drinking contexts. Specifically, this research aimed to determine if college students overestimate peer drinking by several drinking contexts (i.e., bar, fraternity/sorority party, non-fraternity/sorority party, sporting event) and to examine whether normative perceptions for drinking by contexts relate to one's own drinking behavior specific to these contexts. Method: Students (N = 1,468; 56.4{\%} female) participated in a web-based survey by completing measures assessing drinking behavior and perceived descriptive drinking norms for various contexts. Results: Findings demonstrated that students consistently overestimated the drinking behavior for the typical same-sex student in various drinking contexts, with the most prominent being fraternity/sorority parties. In addition, results indicated that same-sex normative perceptions for drinking by contexts were associated with personal drinking behavior within these contexts. Conclusions: Results stress the importance of specificity of social norms beyond those related to the normative referent. Clinical implications are discussed in terms of preventions and intervention efforts as well as risks associated with drinking in a novel context.",
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They drink how much and where? Normative perceptions by drinking contexts and their association to college students' alcohol consumption. / Lewis, Melissa Ardelle; Litt, Dana Michelle; Blayney, Jessica A.; Lostutter, Ty W.; Granato, Hollie; Kilmer, Jason R.; Lee, Christine M.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 72, No. 5, 01.01.2011, p. 844-853.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Litt, Dana Michelle

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AU - Kilmer, Jason R.

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