The relationship of CRP and cognition in cognitively normal older Mexican Americans

A cross-sectional study of the HABLE cohort

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker for cardiovascular events and also has been studied as a biomarker for cognitive decline. By the year 2050 the Hispanic population in the United States will reach 106 million, and 65% of those will be of Mexican heritage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between CRP levels and cognitive functioning in a sample of Mexican American older adults. A cross-sectional analysis of data from 328 cognitive normal, Mexican American participants from the community-based Health and Aging Brain Among Latino Elders (HABLE) study were performed. Statistical methods included t-test, chi square, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression modeling. Cognitive performance was measured by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Logical Memory I and II, Digit Span, FAS, and Animal Naming tests. Age, years of education, gender, diagnostic of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were entered in the model as covariates. High CRP levels significantly predicted FAS scores (B = -0.135, P = .01), even after adjusting for covariates. Education (B = 0.30, P < .05), and diagnosis of hypertension (B = -0.12, P = .02) were also independent predictors of FAS scores. Participants with higher CRP levels had greater adjusted odds of poorer performance in the FAS test (OR = 1.75, 95% CI = 1.13-2.72, P = .01) when compared to participants with lower CRP levels. This was also true for participants with hypertension (OR = 2.20, 95% CI = 1.34-3.60, P < .05). Higher CRP levels were not associated with MMSE, logical memory, digit span, and animal naming scores. In conclusion, our study showed a clear association between CRP levels and verbal fluency and executive function in a cognitively normal community-dwelling population of Mexican-Americans.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e15605
JournalMedicine
Volume98
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2019

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Hispanic Americans
C-Reactive Protein
Cognition
Cross-Sectional Studies
Health
Brain
Hypertension
Biomarkers
Independent Living
Education
Executive Function
Chi-Square Distribution
Dyslipidemias
Population
Linear Models
Logistic Models

Cite this

@article{e6d068d5fd6945c5a5f3b0083eb57a31,
title = "The relationship of CRP and cognition in cognitively normal older Mexican Americans: A cross-sectional study of the HABLE cohort",
abstract = "C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker for cardiovascular events and also has been studied as a biomarker for cognitive decline. By the year 2050 the Hispanic population in the United States will reach 106 million, and 65{\%} of those will be of Mexican heritage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between CRP levels and cognitive functioning in a sample of Mexican American older adults. A cross-sectional analysis of data from 328 cognitive normal, Mexican American participants from the community-based Health and Aging Brain Among Latino Elders (HABLE) study were performed. Statistical methods included t-test, chi square, multiple linear regression, and logistic regression modeling. Cognitive performance was measured by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Logical Memory I and II, Digit Span, FAS, and Animal Naming tests. Age, years of education, gender, diagnostic of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia were entered in the model as covariates. High CRP levels significantly predicted FAS scores (B = -0.135, P = .01), even after adjusting for covariates. Education (B = 0.30, P < .05), and diagnosis of hypertension (B = -0.12, P = .02) were also independent predictors of FAS scores. Participants with higher CRP levels had greater adjusted odds of poorer performance in the FAS test (OR = 1.75, 95{\%} CI = 1.13-2.72, P = .01) when compared to participants with lower CRP levels. This was also true for participants with hypertension (OR = 2.20, 95{\%} CI = 1.34-3.60, P < .05). Higher CRP levels were not associated with MMSE, logical memory, digit span, and animal naming scores. In conclusion, our study showed a clear association between CRP levels and verbal fluency and executive function in a cognitively normal community-dwelling population of Mexican-Americans.",
author = "Raul Vintimilla and James Hall and Johnson, {Leigh A.} and Sidney O'Bryant",
year = "2019",
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The relationship of CRP and cognition in cognitively normal older Mexican Americans : A cross-sectional study of the HABLE cohort. / Vintimilla, Raul; Hall, James; Johnson, Leigh A.; O'Bryant, Sidney.

In: Medicine, Vol. 98, No. 19, 01.05.2019, p. e15605.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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