The Implementation of an Interpersonal Violence Screening Program in Primary Care Settings: Lessons Learned

Erika L. Thompson, Kimberly G. Fulda, Jessica Grace, Annalynn M. Galvin, Emily E. Spence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Interpersonal violence (IPV) is a public health issue that disproportionately affects women. IPV screening improves likelihood of survivor disclosure and access to additional support. To enhance primary care IPV screening, Technology Enhanced Screening and Supportive Assistance (TESSA) uses integrated technological systems to deliver bidirectional, evidence-informed health navigation, health management, and safety interventions. This study evaluates TESSA implementation in primary care clinics using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Method: CFIR is a metatheoretical framework used for evaluating clinical intervention implementation. Salient constructs within CFIR’s five domains (intervention characteristics, outer setting, inner setting, characteristics of individuals, and process) were identified (23 constructs), and pertinent implementation details were examined. Results: Key lessons learned included intervention characteristic constructs like intervention source (e.g., selecting tablets that can screen for items integral to the program’s aims) and adaptability (e.g., ensuring tablets worked with electronic medical records for each clinic), process constructs like engaging champions (e.g., garnering buy-in from key clinic stakeholders and staff), outer setting constructs like patient needs and resources (e.g., addressing pertinent patient resource needs) and external policies and incentives (e.g., incentivizing clinics by addressing clinic needs), and inner setting constructs like leadership engagement (e.g., ensuring buy-in from organizational leaders as leadership changed frequently). Conclusions: CFIR identifies important implementation factors for programs like TESSA that screen for high-risk populations and implement in primary care settings. The TESSA program implementation permits increased IPV screening among primary health care populations, thus promoting access to resources for otherwise hard-to-reach populations.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHealth Promotion Practice
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • health advocacy
  • health promotion
  • interpersonal violence
  • screening
  • technology

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