The essential role of neutrophils during infection with the intracellular bacterial pathogen listeria monocytogenes

Alexandra R. Witter, Busola M. Okunnu, Rance E. Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

32 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neutrophils have historically been characterized as first responder cells vital to host survival because of their ability to contain and eliminate bacterial and fungal pathogens. However, recent studies have shown that neutrophils participate in both protective and detrimental responses to a diverse array of inflammatory and infectious diseases. Although the contribution of neutrophils to extracellular infections has been investigated for decades, their specific role during intracellular bacterial infections has only recently been appreciated. During infection with the Gram-positive intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes, neutrophils are recruited from the bone marrow to sites of infection where they use novel bacterial-sensing pathways leading to phagocytosis and production of bactericidal factors. This review summarizes the requirement of neutrophils during L. monocytogenes infection by examining both neutrophil trafficking and function during primary and secondary infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1557-1565
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume197
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2016

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