The Epidemiology of Cocaine Use Among Hispanic Individuals: Findings From the 2015–2018 National Survey of Drug Use and Health

Andrew Yockey, Shanna Stryker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Cocaine use disproportionately affects several social groups, including ethnic and sexual minorities. The present study sought to identify the epidemiology of cocaine use among a national sample of Hispanic young adults using pooled data from the 2015–2018 National Survey of Drug Use and Health. Weighted analyses were used to identify correlates to past-year cocaine use. Results revealed that 4.11% (n = 729) of individuals used cocaine in the past year. Individuals who identified as gay/lesbian or bisexual, who drove under the influence of alcohol in the past year, and who reported prior drug use were at risk of cocaine use. Of concern, nearly 10% of gay/lesbian Hispanic individuals report having used cocaine in the past year. Furthermore, cocaine use was associated with other risky behaviors; 41.1% of LSD (Lysergic acid diethylamide) users also reported cocaine use, and 18.2% of cocaine users reported having driven under the influence of alcohol within the past year. Findings from the present study may inform harm reduction efforts and health prevention messages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)105-111
Number of pages7
JournalHispanic Health Care International
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • cocaine
  • harm reduction
  • Hispanic Americans
  • prevention

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Epidemiology of Cocaine Use Among Hispanic Individuals: Findings From the 2015–2018 National Survey of Drug Use and Health'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this