The effects of peer relational victimization on social cognition

Rejection attribution bias or a more generalized sensitivity to social pain?

Anna Park, Lauri A. Jensen-Campbell, Haylie Lauren Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study tested two possible ways that being relationally victimized may affect social cognition. Victims may develop a rejection attribution bias (i.e., experiencing social pain by engaging in cue distortion and attributing ambiguous social behavior to intentional rejection). Conversely, victims may develop a more generalized sensitivity to social pain, wherein they react negatively to a wider spectrum of social situations—even those in which they are obviously included and excluded). Participants (males = 55, females = 134) completed online surveys containing demographic, personality, and peer victimization measures. In a later session, participants came to the lab and were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: overt exclusion, ambiguous nonexclusion, and overt inclusion as part of an online ball-tossing game (Cyberball). The participants then completed self-report measures regarding their mood and experiences during the game. The results provided more support for the theoretical model that victims have a more generalized sensitivity to social pain; the rejection attribution theory was not supported.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)984-1006
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Social and Personal Relationships
Volume34
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Social Distance
Crime Victims
social cognition
victimization
Cognition
attribution
pain
Pain
trend
attribution theory
Social Behavior
social behavior
online survey
mood
Self Report
Cues
Personality
personality
Theoretical Models
exclusion

Keywords

  • Cyberball
  • rejection
  • relational victimization
  • social cognition
  • social pain

Cite this

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title = "The effects of peer relational victimization on social cognition: Rejection attribution bias or a more generalized sensitivity to social pain?",
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The effects of peer relational victimization on social cognition : Rejection attribution bias or a more generalized sensitivity to social pain? / Park, Anna; Jensen-Campbell, Lauri A.; Miller, Haylie Lauren.

In: Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Vol. 34, No. 7, 01.11.2017, p. 984-1006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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