The effect of depression on health care utilization and costs in patients with type 2 diabetes

Iftekhar D. Kalsekar, Suresh M. Madhavan, Mayur M. Amonkar, Virginia Scott, Stratford M. Douglas, Eugene Makela

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The objective of the study was to estimate the effect of depression on health care utilization and costs in patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Patients were identified during a four-year enrollment period (1998-2001) from a Medicaid claims database. The final cohort consisted of 4,294 patients with type 2 diabetes (1,525 patients with depression; 2,769 patients without depression). Multivariate results indicated that significant utilization differences existed between the two groups: Patients who were depressed incurred a higher number of physician office visits, emergency room/inpatient admissions, and more prescriptions compared with patients who had diabetes but were not depressed. Patients with depression had nearly 65% higher overall health care costs than those without depression. Recognizing that depression is as a risk factor for increasing health care expenditures has the potential to improve diabetes management and related outcomes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)39-46
Number of pages8
JournalManaged Care Interface
Volume19
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2006

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Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Health Care Costs
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Office Visits
Physicians' Offices
Medicaid
Health Expenditures
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Prescriptions
Hospital Emergency Service
Inpatients
Databases
Delivery of Health Care

Cite this

Kalsekar, I. D., Madhavan, S. M., Amonkar, M. M., Scott, V., Douglas, S. M., & Makela, E. (2006). The effect of depression on health care utilization and costs in patients with type 2 diabetes. Managed Care Interface, 19(3), 39-46.
Kalsekar, Iftekhar D. ; Madhavan, Suresh M. ; Amonkar, Mayur M. ; Scott, Virginia ; Douglas, Stratford M. ; Makela, Eugene. / The effect of depression on health care utilization and costs in patients with type 2 diabetes. In: Managed Care Interface. 2006 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 39-46.
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Kalsekar, ID, Madhavan, SM, Amonkar, MM, Scott, V, Douglas, SM & Makela, E 2006, 'The effect of depression on health care utilization and costs in patients with type 2 diabetes', Managed Care Interface, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 39-46.

The effect of depression on health care utilization and costs in patients with type 2 diabetes. / Kalsekar, Iftekhar D.; Madhavan, Suresh M.; Amonkar, Mayur M.; Scott, Virginia; Douglas, Stratford M.; Makela, Eugene.

In: Managed Care Interface, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.03.2006, p. 39-46.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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