Substitution and cross-tolerance profiles of anorectic drugs in rats trained to detect the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine

Douglas M. Wood, Michael W. Emmett-Oglesby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

50 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rats were trained to discriminate cocaine, 10.0 mg/kg, using a two-lever operant procedure. Dose-effect data were determined for the substitution of cocaine, diethylpropion, methylphenidate, phenmetrazine, phentermine, and fenfluramine for the cocaine stimulus. All of these drugs, except fenfluramine, substituted fully for the cocaine stimulus. Subsequently, training was halted and cocaine, 20 mg/kg/8 h, was administered for 9 days, and dose-effect data were redetermined for all of these drugs on days 7-9 of chronic administration. Chronic administration of cocaine produced tolerance to the stimulus properties of cocaine, and cross-tolerance to the stimulus properties of methylphenidate, phenmetrazine, and phentermine, such that doses approximately two-fold higher than those used acutely were necessary to reproduce the original effect; the potency for the substitution of diethylpropion for the cocaine stimulus was decreased greater than four-fold; and fenfluramine still failed to substitute for the cocaine stimulus. These data suggest that 1) a common mechanism may mediate tolerance to the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine, methylphenidate, phenmetrazine, and phentermine, and 2) tolerance in the drug discrimination procedure may have potential for establishing a comprehensive evaluation of dependence liability of CNS stimulants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)364-368
Number of pages5
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume95
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 1988

Keywords

  • Amphetamine
  • CNS stimulants
  • Cocaine
  • Drug discrimination
  • Rat
  • Tolerance

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