Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening among College Women by Race/Ethnicity and Number of Male Sex Partners: National Survey of Family Growth, 2013–2015

Stacey B. Griner, Jason W. Beckstead, Cheryl A. Vamos, Joseph A. Puccio, Kay Perrin, Ellen M. Daley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship of race/ethnicity and number of male partners with sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening among college women in the United States. Methods: Using National Survey of Family Growth data, survey-weighted multiple predictor logistic regression models were analyzed. Results: Hispanic, Black, and Other race women had higher odds of STI screening than White women. Screening odds increased by 35% with each additional partner. The effect of number of partners on STI screening differed by race/ethnicity. Conclusions: Results may provide considerations when tailoring health communication campaigns to ultimately increase STI screening rates.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-150
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Sexual Health
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Chlamydia
  • Screening
  • gonorrhea
  • sexually transmitted infections
  • young adults

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sexually Transmitted Infection Screening among College Women by Race/Ethnicity and Number of Male Sex Partners: National Survey of Family Growth, 2013–2015'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this