Sexually transmitted infection prevention with long-acting reversible contraception

Factors associated with dual use

Erika Lynne Thompson, Cheryl A. Vamos, Stacey Barrett Griner, Rachel Logan, Coralia Vázquez-Otero, Ellen M. Daley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is extremely effective in preventing pregnancy; however, it does not provide sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention. Therefore, dual use is recommended for the prevention of STIs, in addition to pregnancy, by using LARC methods with condoms. This study assessed factors associated with LARC only use and dual-LARC and condom use among college women. Methods: The National College Health Assessment-II Fall 2012 to 2013 was used for this analysis. The analytic sample was restricted to women who used a LARC method (ie, intrauterine device or implant) (N = 1658). The main outcome was dual method use, LARC and condom, at last sex. An adjusted logistic regression model assessed sociodemographic factors (age, relationship, race), health care utilization (routine gynecological examination), and sexual behavior (number of partners) as factors associated with dual condom-LARC use at the last time of vaginal-sex. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results: Among women reporting LARC use, 24% used a condom. Dual users were less likely to have only 1 sexual partner (adjusted PR [aPR], 0.66; 95% CI, 0.54-0.81) and be in a relationship. Dual users were more likely than LARC-only users to be Hispanic (aPR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.78), black (aPR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.07-1.83), and biracial/multiracial (aPR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10-1.73). Conclusions: These findings illustrate differences between dual-condom LARC and LARC-only college users. It is likely that relationship status and number of partners influences perceived risk for STIs and decision making for dual use among this population.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)423-427
Number of pages5
JournalSexually Transmitted Diseases
Volume44
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017

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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Contraception
Condoms
Confidence Intervals
Logistic Models
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Pregnancy
Gynecological Examination
Intrauterine Devices
Sexual Partners
Age Factors
Hispanic Americans
Sexual Behavior
Decision Making

Cite this

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title = "Sexually transmitted infection prevention with long-acting reversible contraception: Factors associated with dual use",
abstract = "Background: Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is extremely effective in preventing pregnancy; however, it does not provide sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention. Therefore, dual use is recommended for the prevention of STIs, in addition to pregnancy, by using LARC methods with condoms. This study assessed factors associated with LARC only use and dual-LARC and condom use among college women. Methods: The National College Health Assessment-II Fall 2012 to 2013 was used for this analysis. The analytic sample was restricted to women who used a LARC method (ie, intrauterine device or implant) (N = 1658). The main outcome was dual method use, LARC and condom, at last sex. An adjusted logistic regression model assessed sociodemographic factors (age, relationship, race), health care utilization (routine gynecological examination), and sexual behavior (number of partners) as factors associated with dual condom-LARC use at the last time of vaginal-sex. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results: Among women reporting LARC use, 24{\%} used a condom. Dual users were less likely to have only 1 sexual partner (adjusted PR [aPR], 0.66; 95{\%} CI, 0.54-0.81) and be in a relationship. Dual users were more likely than LARC-only users to be Hispanic (aPR, 1.34; 95{\%} CI, 1.01-1.78), black (aPR, 1.40; 95{\%} CI, 1.07-1.83), and biracial/multiracial (aPR, 1.38; 95{\%} CI, 1.10-1.73). Conclusions: These findings illustrate differences between dual-condom LARC and LARC-only college users. It is likely that relationship status and number of partners influences perceived risk for STIs and decision making for dual use among this population.",
author = "Thompson, {Erika Lynne} and Vamos, {Cheryl A.} and Griner, {Stacey Barrett} and Rachel Logan and Coralia V{\'a}zquez-Otero and Daley, {Ellen M.}",
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Sexually transmitted infection prevention with long-acting reversible contraception : Factors associated with dual use. / Thompson, Erika Lynne; Vamos, Cheryl A.; Griner, Stacey Barrett; Logan, Rachel; Vázquez-Otero, Coralia; Daley, Ellen M.

In: Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Vol. 44, No. 7, 01.01.2017, p. 423-427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Sexually transmitted infection prevention with long-acting reversible contraception

T2 - Factors associated with dual use

AU - Thompson, Erika Lynne

AU - Vamos, Cheryl A.

AU - Griner, Stacey Barrett

AU - Logan, Rachel

AU - Vázquez-Otero, Coralia

AU - Daley, Ellen M.

PY - 2017/1/1

Y1 - 2017/1/1

N2 - Background: Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is extremely effective in preventing pregnancy; however, it does not provide sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention. Therefore, dual use is recommended for the prevention of STIs, in addition to pregnancy, by using LARC methods with condoms. This study assessed factors associated with LARC only use and dual-LARC and condom use among college women. Methods: The National College Health Assessment-II Fall 2012 to 2013 was used for this analysis. The analytic sample was restricted to women who used a LARC method (ie, intrauterine device or implant) (N = 1658). The main outcome was dual method use, LARC and condom, at last sex. An adjusted logistic regression model assessed sociodemographic factors (age, relationship, race), health care utilization (routine gynecological examination), and sexual behavior (number of partners) as factors associated with dual condom-LARC use at the last time of vaginal-sex. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results: Among women reporting LARC use, 24% used a condom. Dual users were less likely to have only 1 sexual partner (adjusted PR [aPR], 0.66; 95% CI, 0.54-0.81) and be in a relationship. Dual users were more likely than LARC-only users to be Hispanic (aPR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.78), black (aPR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.07-1.83), and biracial/multiracial (aPR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10-1.73). Conclusions: These findings illustrate differences between dual-condom LARC and LARC-only college users. It is likely that relationship status and number of partners influences perceived risk for STIs and decision making for dual use among this population.

AB - Background: Long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) is extremely effective in preventing pregnancy; however, it does not provide sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention. Therefore, dual use is recommended for the prevention of STIs, in addition to pregnancy, by using LARC methods with condoms. This study assessed factors associated with LARC only use and dual-LARC and condom use among college women. Methods: The National College Health Assessment-II Fall 2012 to 2013 was used for this analysis. The analytic sample was restricted to women who used a LARC method (ie, intrauterine device or implant) (N = 1658). The main outcome was dual method use, LARC and condom, at last sex. An adjusted logistic regression model assessed sociodemographic factors (age, relationship, race), health care utilization (routine gynecological examination), and sexual behavior (number of partners) as factors associated with dual condom-LARC use at the last time of vaginal-sex. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated. Results: Among women reporting LARC use, 24% used a condom. Dual users were less likely to have only 1 sexual partner (adjusted PR [aPR], 0.66; 95% CI, 0.54-0.81) and be in a relationship. Dual users were more likely than LARC-only users to be Hispanic (aPR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.01-1.78), black (aPR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.07-1.83), and biracial/multiracial (aPR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.10-1.73). Conclusions: These findings illustrate differences between dual-condom LARC and LARC-only college users. It is likely that relationship status and number of partners influences perceived risk for STIs and decision making for dual use among this population.

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