Self-esteem, Acculturative Stress, and Marijuana Use Among Hispanic College Students

R. Andrew Yockey, Jennifer L. Brown, Andrew K. Littlefield, Amelia E. Talley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Previous research has found mixed results regarding the association between acculturation and substance use in Hispanic populations. Additional research is warranted to examine relations among facets of acculturation, particularly acculturative stress, and marijuana use. The purpose of this study was to examine whether self-esteem mediates the relation between acculturative stress and a lifetime history of marijuana use among a sample of Hispanic college students. Hispanic college students (N = 204; Mean age = 20.3 years) from a large southwestern university participated in an online study and reported on lifetime marijuana use, self-esteem, and acculturative stress. We evaluated the hypothesis that self-esteem would mediate the relation between acculturative stress and the likelihood of reporting a history of marijuana use, utilizing Hayes’ SPSS macro, which provides estimates of boot-strapped confidence intervals for the indirect effect. Results showed that self-esteem did not significantly mediate the relation between acculturative stress and likelihood of marijuana use [b =.157, 95% CI (−.003,.017)]. Future studies might examine other facets of acculturation in relation to substance use, utilizing a longitudinal approach to better understand these associations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)416-425
Number of pages10
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • acculturative stress
  • college students
  • Hispanic
  • marijuana
  • self-esteem

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