Responses of cerebral blood velocity and tissue oxygenation to low-frequency oscillations during simulated haemorrhagic stress in humans

Garen K. Anderson, Justin D. Sprick, Flora S. Park, Alexander J. Rosenberg, Caroline Alice Rickards

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Do low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity protect cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during central hypovolaemia? What is the main finding and its importance? Low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity attenuate reductions in cerebral oxygen saturation but do not protect absolute cerebral blood velocity during central hypovolaemia. This finding indicates the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining cerebral oxygenation and therefore viability of tissues during challenges to cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Abstract: Tolerance to both real and simulated haemorrhage varies between individuals. Exaggerated low-frequency (∼0.1 Hz) oscillations in mean arterial pressure and brain blood flow [indexed via middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv)] have been associated with improved tolerance to reduced central blood volume. The mechanism for this association has not been explored. We hypothesized that inducing low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity would attenuate reductions in cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during simulated haemorrhage. Fourteen subjects (11 men and three women) were exposed to oscillatory (0.1 and 0.05 Hz) and non-oscillatory (0 Hz) lower-body negative pressure profiles with an average chamber pressure of −60 mmHg (randomized and counterbalanced order). Measurements included arterial pressure and stroke volume via finger photoplethysmography, MCAv via transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe via near-infrared spectroscopy. Tolerance was higher during the two oscillatory profiles compared with the 0 Hz profile (0.05 Hz, P = 0.04; 0.1 Hz, P = 0.09), accompanied by attenuated reductions in stroke volume (P < 0.001) and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe (P ≤ 0.02). No differences were observed between profiles for reductions in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.17) and MCAv (P = 0.30). In partial support of our hypothesis, cerebral oxygenation, but not cerebral blood velocity, was protected during the oscillatory profiles. Interestingly, more subjects tolerated the oscillatory profiles compared with the static 0 Hz profile, despite similar arterial pressure responses. These findings emphasize the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining perfusion and oxygenation of cerebral tissues during haemorrhagic stress.

Original languageEnglish
JournalExperimental Physiology
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Arterial Pressure
Middle Cerebral Artery
Hypovolemia
Frontal Lobe
Stroke Volume
Cerebrovascular Circulation
Hemodynamics
Photoplethysmography
Lower Body Negative Pressure
Hemorrhage
Oxygen
Tissue Survival
Doppler Ultrasonography
Near-Infrared Spectroscopy
Blood Volume
Fingers
Perfusion
Pressure
Brain

Keywords

  • cerebral blood flow
  • cerebral oxygen saturation
  • oscillatory lower-body negative pressure

Cite this

@article{3e2ab3d11cb84787941964ffcadceb9f,
title = "Responses of cerebral blood velocity and tissue oxygenation to low-frequency oscillations during simulated haemorrhagic stress in humans",
abstract = "New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Do low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity protect cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during central hypovolaemia? What is the main finding and its importance? Low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity attenuate reductions in cerebral oxygen saturation but do not protect absolute cerebral blood velocity during central hypovolaemia. This finding indicates the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining cerebral oxygenation and therefore viability of tissues during challenges to cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Abstract: Tolerance to both real and simulated haemorrhage varies between individuals. Exaggerated low-frequency (∼0.1 Hz) oscillations in mean arterial pressure and brain blood flow [indexed via middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv)] have been associated with improved tolerance to reduced central blood volume. The mechanism for this association has not been explored. We hypothesized that inducing low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity would attenuate reductions in cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during simulated haemorrhage. Fourteen subjects (11 men and three women) were exposed to oscillatory (0.1 and 0.05 Hz) and non-oscillatory (0 Hz) lower-body negative pressure profiles with an average chamber pressure of −60 mmHg (randomized and counterbalanced order). Measurements included arterial pressure and stroke volume via finger photoplethysmography, MCAv via transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe via near-infrared spectroscopy. Tolerance was higher during the two oscillatory profiles compared with the 0 Hz profile (0.05 Hz, P = 0.04; 0.1 Hz, P = 0.09), accompanied by attenuated reductions in stroke volume (P < 0.001) and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe (P ≤ 0.02). No differences were observed between profiles for reductions in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.17) and MCAv (P = 0.30). In partial support of our hypothesis, cerebral oxygenation, but not cerebral blood velocity, was protected during the oscillatory profiles. Interestingly, more subjects tolerated the oscillatory profiles compared with the static 0 Hz profile, despite similar arterial pressure responses. These findings emphasize the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining perfusion and oxygenation of cerebral tissues during haemorrhagic stress.",
keywords = "cerebral blood flow, cerebral oxygen saturation, oscillatory lower-body negative pressure",
author = "Anderson, {Garen K.} and Sprick, {Justin D.} and Park, {Flora S.} and Rosenberg, {Alexander J.} and Rickards, {Caroline Alice}",
year = "2019",
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doi = "10.1113/EP087358",
language = "English",
journal = "Experimental Physiology",
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Responses of cerebral blood velocity and tissue oxygenation to low-frequency oscillations during simulated haemorrhagic stress in humans. / Anderson, Garen K.; Sprick, Justin D.; Park, Flora S.; Rosenberg, Alexander J.; Rickards, Caroline Alice.

In: Experimental Physiology, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Responses of cerebral blood velocity and tissue oxygenation to low-frequency oscillations during simulated haemorrhagic stress in humans

AU - Anderson, Garen K.

AU - Sprick, Justin D.

AU - Park, Flora S.

AU - Rosenberg, Alexander J.

AU - Rickards, Caroline Alice

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Do low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity protect cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during central hypovolaemia? What is the main finding and its importance? Low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity attenuate reductions in cerebral oxygen saturation but do not protect absolute cerebral blood velocity during central hypovolaemia. This finding indicates the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining cerebral oxygenation and therefore viability of tissues during challenges to cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Abstract: Tolerance to both real and simulated haemorrhage varies between individuals. Exaggerated low-frequency (∼0.1 Hz) oscillations in mean arterial pressure and brain blood flow [indexed via middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv)] have been associated with improved tolerance to reduced central blood volume. The mechanism for this association has not been explored. We hypothesized that inducing low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity would attenuate reductions in cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during simulated haemorrhage. Fourteen subjects (11 men and three women) were exposed to oscillatory (0.1 and 0.05 Hz) and non-oscillatory (0 Hz) lower-body negative pressure profiles with an average chamber pressure of −60 mmHg (randomized and counterbalanced order). Measurements included arterial pressure and stroke volume via finger photoplethysmography, MCAv via transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe via near-infrared spectroscopy. Tolerance was higher during the two oscillatory profiles compared with the 0 Hz profile (0.05 Hz, P = 0.04; 0.1 Hz, P = 0.09), accompanied by attenuated reductions in stroke volume (P < 0.001) and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe (P ≤ 0.02). No differences were observed between profiles for reductions in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.17) and MCAv (P = 0.30). In partial support of our hypothesis, cerebral oxygenation, but not cerebral blood velocity, was protected during the oscillatory profiles. Interestingly, more subjects tolerated the oscillatory profiles compared with the static 0 Hz profile, despite similar arterial pressure responses. These findings emphasize the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining perfusion and oxygenation of cerebral tissues during haemorrhagic stress.

AB - New Findings: What is the central question of this study? Do low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity protect cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during central hypovolaemia? What is the main finding and its importance? Low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity attenuate reductions in cerebral oxygen saturation but do not protect absolute cerebral blood velocity during central hypovolaemia. This finding indicates the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining cerebral oxygenation and therefore viability of tissues during challenges to cerebral blood flow and oxygen delivery. Abstract: Tolerance to both real and simulated haemorrhage varies between individuals. Exaggerated low-frequency (∼0.1 Hz) oscillations in mean arterial pressure and brain blood flow [indexed via middle cerebral artery velocity (MCAv)] have been associated with improved tolerance to reduced central blood volume. The mechanism for this association has not been explored. We hypothesized that inducing low-frequency oscillations in arterial pressure and cerebral blood velocity would attenuate reductions in cerebral blood velocity and oxygenation during simulated haemorrhage. Fourteen subjects (11 men and three women) were exposed to oscillatory (0.1 and 0.05 Hz) and non-oscillatory (0 Hz) lower-body negative pressure profiles with an average chamber pressure of −60 mmHg (randomized and counterbalanced order). Measurements included arterial pressure and stroke volume via finger photoplethysmography, MCAv via transcranial Doppler ultrasound, and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe via near-infrared spectroscopy. Tolerance was higher during the two oscillatory profiles compared with the 0 Hz profile (0.05 Hz, P = 0.04; 0.1 Hz, P = 0.09), accompanied by attenuated reductions in stroke volume (P < 0.001) and cerebral oxygenation of the frontal lobe (P ≤ 0.02). No differences were observed between profiles for reductions in mean arterial pressure (P = 0.17) and MCAv (P = 0.30). In partial support of our hypothesis, cerebral oxygenation, but not cerebral blood velocity, was protected during the oscillatory profiles. Interestingly, more subjects tolerated the oscillatory profiles compared with the static 0 Hz profile, despite similar arterial pressure responses. These findings emphasize the potential importance of haemodynamic oscillations in maintaining perfusion and oxygenation of cerebral tissues during haemorrhagic stress.

KW - cerebral blood flow

KW - cerebral oxygen saturation

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