Relationships Among Chewing Tobacco, Cigarette Smoking, and Chronic Health Conditions in Males 18–44 Years of Age

Shanda L. Hernandez, Haley E. Banks, Adrianne E. Bailey, Melissa J. Bachman, John Kane, Jessica L. Hartos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

As more public places are designated “non-smoking,” chewing tobacco could be an alternative choice for tobacco use; however, controversy exists over the long-term health effects associated with it. This study assessed the relationship between chewing tobacco, cigarette smoking, and chronic health conditions in a representative sample of males 18–44 years of age, while controlling for other variables known to be related to tobacco use. This cross sectional analysis used 2013 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). The results indicated that about 41% of males reported one or more chronic health conditions, and that about 15% used chewing tobacco only, 21% smoked cigarettes only, and 6% did both. From adjusted analyses, those who chewed tobacco only were 49% more likely to report one or more health conditions; those who smoked cigarettes only were 34% more likely to report one or more health conditions; and those who did both were 95% more likely to report at least one health condition. Overall, any combination of tobacco use was significantly and similarly related to the increased prevalence of chronic health conditions in males aged 18–44 years. Although chewing tobacco use may not be as prevalent in the general population as cigarette smoking, clinicians should be aware of the similar health risks associated with all tobacco use at ages younger than may be expected, and encourage cessation of any tobacco use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-514
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Primary Prevention
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2017

Keywords

  • Adult males
  • Chronic health conditions
  • General health
  • Smokeless tobacco use
  • Tobacco use

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