Ransmission dynamics of tuberculosis in Tarrant County, Texas

Stephen Weis, Janice M. Pogoda, Zhenhua Yang, M. Donald Cave, Charles Wallace, Michael Kelley, Peter F. Barnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

61 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To understand the transmission dynamics of tuberculosis in Tarrant County, Texas, we performed a population-based study of 159 patients with culture-proven tuberculosis, combining restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates with prospective interviewing to identify epidemiologic links between patients. Patients whose isolates had identical or closely related RFLP patterns were considered a cluster. Seventy-six (48%) of 159 patients were in 19 clusters, suggesting that recent transmission accounted for 36% of tuberculosis morbidity. Unconditional logistic regression showed that birth in the United States, continuous residence in Tarrant County, a history of homelessness, and a history of visiting or working in bars were independent predictors of clustering. Four hornless shelters and five bars were associated with specific clusters, suggesting that they were sites of tuberculous transmission. Patients in some clusters recognized more photographs of patients in their cluster than did patients outside their cluster. We conclude that (1) homeless shelters and bars are important sites of tuberculosis transmission in Tarrant County, and (2) the use of photograph recognition of patients with tuberculosis, in combination with RFLP analysis, has the potential to enhance tuberculous control by facilitating identification of epidemiologic links between patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-42
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume166
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2002

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Tuberculosis
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
Homeless Persons
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Cluster Analysis
Logistic Models
Parturition
Morbidity
Population

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Homeless
  • Restriction fragment length polymorphism
  • Transmission
  • Tuberculosis
  • Urban

Cite this

Weis, S., Pogoda, J. M., Yang, Z., Donald Cave, M., Wallace, C., Kelley, M., & Barnes, P. F. (2002). Ransmission dynamics of tuberculosis in Tarrant County, Texas. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 166(1), 36-42. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.2109089
Weis, Stephen ; Pogoda, Janice M. ; Yang, Zhenhua ; Donald Cave, M. ; Wallace, Charles ; Kelley, Michael ; Barnes, Peter F. / Ransmission dynamics of tuberculosis in Tarrant County, Texas. In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. 2002 ; Vol. 166, No. 1. pp. 36-42.
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Weis, S, Pogoda, JM, Yang, Z, Donald Cave, M, Wallace, C, Kelley, M & Barnes, PF 2002, 'Ransmission dynamics of tuberculosis in Tarrant County, Texas', American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 166, no. 1, pp. 36-42. https://doi.org/10.1164/rccm.2109089

Ransmission dynamics of tuberculosis in Tarrant County, Texas. / Weis, Stephen; Pogoda, Janice M.; Yang, Zhenhua; Donald Cave, M.; Wallace, Charles; Kelley, Michael; Barnes, Peter F.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 166, No. 1, 01.07.2002, p. 36-42.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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