Racial Disparities in Menu-Labeling Usage: Analysis of the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Sugar-Sweetened Beverage and Menu-Labeling Module

Sufana Shikdar, Sumihiro Suzuki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Race/ethnic disparities in obesity are widely reported and are often attributed to diet-related factors, such as menu-labeling usage. We aimed to determine whether racial difference exists in menu-labeling usage. Methods: Data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. Menu labeling was measured from the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Menu Labeling module administered in 18 states. We stratified the population into four race/ethnic categories: non-Hispanic whites (reference, n = 66,019, 63%), non-Hispanic blacks (n = 13,623, 13%), Hispanics (n = 14,671, 14%), and others (n = 7336, 7%). Logistic regression was used to examine the racial/ethnic differences in menu-labeling usage. Analyses were conducted adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, and exercise. Results: The prevalence of menu-labeling usage was approximately 55% overall. Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14–1.60) and other race/ethnic groups (AOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.18–1.64) used menu labeling more compared to non-Hispanic whites. After stratification by race/ethnicity, menu-labeling usage was not associated with exercise or soda consumption among Hispanics, but significant associations were observed among the other three race/ethnic groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that participation in healthy behaviors was associated with the higher usage of menu labeling across all racial/ethnic groups except Hispanics. Future studies are needed to explore this mechanism among individuals engaging in unhealthier behavior as well as how it affects Hispanics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-521
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of racial and ethnic health disparities
Volume5
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Beverages
Hispanic Americans
surveillance
Ethnic Groups
ethnic group
confidence
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Exercise
ethnicity
Obesity
Logistic Models
logistics
Diet
regression
participation
Population

Keywords

  • Food labeling
  • Health policy
  • Minorities
  • Obesity

Cite this

@article{6c33132685ae4de387f9efb19ad20b47,
title = "Racial Disparities in Menu-Labeling Usage: Analysis of the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Sugar-Sweetened Beverage and Menu-Labeling Module",
abstract = "Objectives: Race/ethnic disparities in obesity are widely reported and are often attributed to diet-related factors, such as menu-labeling usage. We aimed to determine whether racial difference exists in menu-labeling usage. Methods: Data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. Menu labeling was measured from the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Menu Labeling module administered in 18 states. We stratified the population into four race/ethnic categories: non-Hispanic whites (reference, n = 66,019, 63{\%}), non-Hispanic blacks (n = 13,623, 13{\%}), Hispanics (n = 14,671, 14{\%}), and others (n = 7336, 7{\%}). Logistic regression was used to examine the racial/ethnic differences in menu-labeling usage. Analyses were conducted adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, and exercise. Results: The prevalence of menu-labeling usage was approximately 55{\%} overall. Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.35; 95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 1.14–1.60) and other race/ethnic groups (AOR, 1.39; 95{\%} CI, 1.18–1.64) used menu labeling more compared to non-Hispanic whites. After stratification by race/ethnicity, menu-labeling usage was not associated with exercise or soda consumption among Hispanics, but significant associations were observed among the other three race/ethnic groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that participation in healthy behaviors was associated with the higher usage of menu labeling across all racial/ethnic groups except Hispanics. Future studies are needed to explore this mechanism among individuals engaging in unhealthier behavior as well as how it affects Hispanics.",
keywords = "Food labeling, Health policy, Minorities, Obesity",
author = "Sufana Shikdar and Sumihiro Suzuki",
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AU - Suzuki, Sumihiro

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N2 - Objectives: Race/ethnic disparities in obesity are widely reported and are often attributed to diet-related factors, such as menu-labeling usage. We aimed to determine whether racial difference exists in menu-labeling usage. Methods: Data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. Menu labeling was measured from the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Menu Labeling module administered in 18 states. We stratified the population into four race/ethnic categories: non-Hispanic whites (reference, n = 66,019, 63%), non-Hispanic blacks (n = 13,623, 13%), Hispanics (n = 14,671, 14%), and others (n = 7336, 7%). Logistic regression was used to examine the racial/ethnic differences in menu-labeling usage. Analyses were conducted adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, and exercise. Results: The prevalence of menu-labeling usage was approximately 55% overall. Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14–1.60) and other race/ethnic groups (AOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.18–1.64) used menu labeling more compared to non-Hispanic whites. After stratification by race/ethnicity, menu-labeling usage was not associated with exercise or soda consumption among Hispanics, but significant associations were observed among the other three race/ethnic groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that participation in healthy behaviors was associated with the higher usage of menu labeling across all racial/ethnic groups except Hispanics. Future studies are needed to explore this mechanism among individuals engaging in unhealthier behavior as well as how it affects Hispanics.

AB - Objectives: Race/ethnic disparities in obesity are widely reported and are often attributed to diet-related factors, such as menu-labeling usage. We aimed to determine whether racial difference exists in menu-labeling usage. Methods: Data from the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were used. Menu labeling was measured from the Sugar-Sweetened Beverages and Menu Labeling module administered in 18 states. We stratified the population into four race/ethnic categories: non-Hispanic whites (reference, n = 66,019, 63%), non-Hispanic blacks (n = 13,623, 13%), Hispanics (n = 14,671, 14%), and others (n = 7336, 7%). Logistic regression was used to examine the racial/ethnic differences in menu-labeling usage. Analyses were conducted adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, sugar-sweetened beverage intake, and exercise. Results: The prevalence of menu-labeling usage was approximately 55% overall. Hispanics (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14–1.60) and other race/ethnic groups (AOR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.18–1.64) used menu labeling more compared to non-Hispanic whites. After stratification by race/ethnicity, menu-labeling usage was not associated with exercise or soda consumption among Hispanics, but significant associations were observed among the other three race/ethnic groups. Conclusions: The findings suggest that participation in healthy behaviors was associated with the higher usage of menu labeling across all racial/ethnic groups except Hispanics. Future studies are needed to explore this mechanism among individuals engaging in unhealthier behavior as well as how it affects Hispanics.

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