Psychosocial Determinants to Prenatal Marijuana Use Among a National Sample of Pregnant Females: 2015–2018

Keith A. King, Rebecca A. Vidourek, R. Andrew Yockey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Marijuana use continues to be rampant among pregnant females. This study sought to examine recent marijuana use among a national sample of pregnant females. Aggregated data from the 2015–2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health were utilized. Weighted analyses revealed that 5.19% of females used marijuana in the past 30 days. Those at greatest risk for recent use were African American (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.91); identified as gay/lesbian (aOR: 11.9) or bisexual (aOR: 3.37); used cigarettes (aOR: 2.74), alcohol (aOR: 5.10), and/or illicit drugs in the past month (aOR: 4.52); and thought marijuana was easy to access (aOR: 7.23). Women at decreased risk were older, Native Hawaiian, in their second trimester, and thought marijuana was a great risk. We believe our findings can inform harm-reduction efforts and inform prevention messages.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)424-435
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Drug Issues
Volume50
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2020

Keywords

  • marijuana
  • pregnancy
  • psychosocial

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