Prescribers and pharmacists requests for prescription monitoring program (PMP) Data: Does PMP structure matter

Marc L. Fleming, Hitesh Chandwani, Jamie C. Barner, Stephanie N. Weber, Tony T. Okoro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) have been purported to be an effective tool to combat prescription drug abuse. However, utilization rates of PMP data by health care providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) is relatively low. The objectives of the study were to describe (1) PMP utilization (e.g., requested reports) by prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement for active state PMPs; (2) PMP utilization by health care providers with and without online access; (3) average annual operational costs for PMPs from 2008 to 2009; and (4) PMP requests based on PMP housing authority (law enforcement vs. non-law enforcement e.g., board of pharmacy). This was a cross-sectional study employing a Web-based survey. A 16-item questionnaire was e-mailed to the 33 operational state PMP administrators and responses were collected from January to March 2011. Descriptive statistics were used to describe PMP request rates and annual operating costs. The usable survey response rate was 45.5%. Among all authorized users, prescribers had higher mean (±SD) requests per 100,000 population (2198.2 ± 3218.0) compared with pharmacists' requests (268.9 ± 261.2). Online accessibility resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population (2996.4 ± 3021.5) compared with mail/fax access (14.6 ± 2.8). On average, PMP annual costs were 12,515 ± $14,911 per 100,000 population. In law enforcement-governed PMPs, health care provider utilization was lower compared with PMPs under health or pharmacy boards. Prescriber request rates were higher than pharmacists and online access for providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population. More research is needed to determine other factors that may be associated with PMP utilization by prescribers and pharmacists.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)136-142
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2013

Fingerprint

Pharmacists
Prescriptions
Law Enforcement
Health Personnel
Costs and Cost Analysis
Population
Prescription Drug Misuse
Telefacsimile
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Postal Service
Administrative Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • PMP
  • Prescription monitoring program
  • Request rates
  • Utilization

Cite this

Fleming, Marc L. ; Chandwani, Hitesh ; Barner, Jamie C. ; Weber, Stephanie N. ; Okoro, Tony T. / Prescribers and pharmacists requests for prescription monitoring program (PMP) Data : Does PMP structure matter. In: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 136-142.
@article{e522c28302a44c81b6e636698a231aad,
title = "Prescribers and pharmacists requests for prescription monitoring program (PMP) Data: Does PMP structure matter",
abstract = "Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) have been purported to be an effective tool to combat prescription drug abuse. However, utilization rates of PMP data by health care providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) is relatively low. The objectives of the study were to describe (1) PMP utilization (e.g., requested reports) by prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement for active state PMPs; (2) PMP utilization by health care providers with and without online access; (3) average annual operational costs for PMPs from 2008 to 2009; and (4) PMP requests based on PMP housing authority (law enforcement vs. non-law enforcement e.g., board of pharmacy). This was a cross-sectional study employing a Web-based survey. A 16-item questionnaire was e-mailed to the 33 operational state PMP administrators and responses were collected from January to March 2011. Descriptive statistics were used to describe PMP request rates and annual operating costs. The usable survey response rate was 45.5{\%}. Among all authorized users, prescribers had higher mean (±SD) requests per 100,000 population (2198.2 ± 3218.0) compared with pharmacists' requests (268.9 ± 261.2). Online accessibility resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population (2996.4 ± 3021.5) compared with mail/fax access (14.6 ± 2.8). On average, PMP annual costs were 12,515 ± $14,911 per 100,000 population. In law enforcement-governed PMPs, health care provider utilization was lower compared with PMPs under health or pharmacy boards. Prescriber request rates were higher than pharmacists and online access for providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population. More research is needed to determine other factors that may be associated with PMP utilization by prescribers and pharmacists.",
keywords = "PMP, Prescription monitoring program, Request rates, Utilization",
author = "Fleming, {Marc L.} and Hitesh Chandwani and Barner, {Jamie C.} and Weber, {Stephanie N.} and Okoro, {Tony T.}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3109/15360288.2013.788598",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "136--142",
journal = "Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy",
issn = "1536-0288",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "2",

}

Prescribers and pharmacists requests for prescription monitoring program (PMP) Data : Does PMP structure matter. / Fleming, Marc L.; Chandwani, Hitesh; Barner, Jamie C.; Weber, Stephanie N.; Okoro, Tony T.

In: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.06.2013, p. 136-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Prescribers and pharmacists requests for prescription monitoring program (PMP) Data

T2 - Does PMP structure matter

AU - Fleming, Marc L.

AU - Chandwani, Hitesh

AU - Barner, Jamie C.

AU - Weber, Stephanie N.

AU - Okoro, Tony T.

PY - 2013/6/1

Y1 - 2013/6/1

N2 - Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) have been purported to be an effective tool to combat prescription drug abuse. However, utilization rates of PMP data by health care providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) is relatively low. The objectives of the study were to describe (1) PMP utilization (e.g., requested reports) by prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement for active state PMPs; (2) PMP utilization by health care providers with and without online access; (3) average annual operational costs for PMPs from 2008 to 2009; and (4) PMP requests based on PMP housing authority (law enforcement vs. non-law enforcement e.g., board of pharmacy). This was a cross-sectional study employing a Web-based survey. A 16-item questionnaire was e-mailed to the 33 operational state PMP administrators and responses were collected from January to March 2011. Descriptive statistics were used to describe PMP request rates and annual operating costs. The usable survey response rate was 45.5%. Among all authorized users, prescribers had higher mean (±SD) requests per 100,000 population (2198.2 ± 3218.0) compared with pharmacists' requests (268.9 ± 261.2). Online accessibility resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population (2996.4 ± 3021.5) compared with mail/fax access (14.6 ± 2.8). On average, PMP annual costs were 12,515 ± $14,911 per 100,000 population. In law enforcement-governed PMPs, health care provider utilization was lower compared with PMPs under health or pharmacy boards. Prescriber request rates were higher than pharmacists and online access for providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population. More research is needed to determine other factors that may be associated with PMP utilization by prescribers and pharmacists.

AB - Prescription monitoring programs (PMPs) have been purported to be an effective tool to combat prescription drug abuse. However, utilization rates of PMP data by health care providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) is relatively low. The objectives of the study were to describe (1) PMP utilization (e.g., requested reports) by prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement for active state PMPs; (2) PMP utilization by health care providers with and without online access; (3) average annual operational costs for PMPs from 2008 to 2009; and (4) PMP requests based on PMP housing authority (law enforcement vs. non-law enforcement e.g., board of pharmacy). This was a cross-sectional study employing a Web-based survey. A 16-item questionnaire was e-mailed to the 33 operational state PMP administrators and responses were collected from January to March 2011. Descriptive statistics were used to describe PMP request rates and annual operating costs. The usable survey response rate was 45.5%. Among all authorized users, prescribers had higher mean (±SD) requests per 100,000 population (2198.2 ± 3218.0) compared with pharmacists' requests (268.9 ± 261.2). Online accessibility resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population (2996.4 ± 3021.5) compared with mail/fax access (14.6 ± 2.8). On average, PMP annual costs were 12,515 ± $14,911 per 100,000 population. In law enforcement-governed PMPs, health care provider utilization was lower compared with PMPs under health or pharmacy boards. Prescriber request rates were higher than pharmacists and online access for providers (e.g., prescribers and pharmacists) resulted in higher request rates per 100,000 population. More research is needed to determine other factors that may be associated with PMP utilization by prescribers and pharmacists.

KW - PMP

KW - Prescription monitoring program

KW - Request rates

KW - Utilization

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879390137&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/15360288.2013.788598

DO - 10.3109/15360288.2013.788598

M3 - Article

C2 - 23688495

AN - SCOPUS:84879390137

VL - 27

SP - 136

EP - 142

JO - Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy

JF - Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy

SN - 1536-0288

IS - 2

ER -