Pharmacy educator evaluation of web-based learning

Alex N. Isaacs, Alison M. Walton, Jasmine D. Gonzalvo, Meredith L. Howard, Sarah A. Nisly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Web-based learning (WBL), instruction facilitated through the Internet, has demonstrated utility in classroom and clinical education settings; however, there is a void of literature about the use of WBL by clinical educators within pharmacy. The purpose of this research is to evaluate a WBL initiative within clinical pharmacy education. Methods: Based on the results of a pilot survey, 10 asynchronous WBL clinical modules (videos and interactive patient cases) were developed for pharmacy educators and students in clinical education affiliated with two schools of pharmacy in the midwest USA. A 21-item, cross-sectional, electronic survey was administered to pharmacy educators within acute and primary care to assess the use of WBL within clinical pharmacy education. Results: Of the 115 eligible clinical educators, 69 participated in the survey (60% response rate), with the majority working within acute care; 38% of educators encouraged the use of WBL. Respondents not using WBL stated a lack of awareness (48%) or existing student time commitments (33%) as reasons. For educators encouraging WBL, 87% agreed that it enhanced student clinical knowledge, 68% stated that it decreased direct instruction time commitments and 100% stated they would encourage its use for future clinical education. Conclusions: Clinical pharmacy educators reported that the WBL initiative resulted in a perceived stronger student clinical foundation, and all pharmacy educators using WBL encouraged its continued use for future clinical education. Web-based learning provides clinical educators with a learning tool to augment clinical experiences by reinforcing student knowledge, at the same time minimising direct instruction time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)630-635
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Teacher
Volume16
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2019

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Learning
Pharmacy Education
Students
Education
Pharmacy Schools
Pharmacy Students
Internet
Primary Health Care
Cross-Sectional Studies
Research
Surveys and Questionnaires

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Isaacs, A. N., Walton, A. M., Gonzalvo, J. D., Howard, M. L., & Nisly, S. A. (2019). Pharmacy educator evaluation of web-based learning. Clinical Teacher, 16(6), 630-635. https://doi.org/10.1111/tct.13003
Isaacs, Alex N. ; Walton, Alison M. ; Gonzalvo, Jasmine D. ; Howard, Meredith L. ; Nisly, Sarah A. / Pharmacy educator evaluation of web-based learning. In: Clinical Teacher. 2019 ; Vol. 16, No. 6. pp. 630-635.
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abstract = "Background: Web-based learning (WBL), instruction facilitated through the Internet, has demonstrated utility in classroom and clinical education settings; however, there is a void of literature about the use of WBL by clinical educators within pharmacy. The purpose of this research is to evaluate a WBL initiative within clinical pharmacy education. Methods: Based on the results of a pilot survey, 10 asynchronous WBL clinical modules (videos and interactive patient cases) were developed for pharmacy educators and students in clinical education affiliated with two schools of pharmacy in the midwest USA. A 21-item, cross-sectional, electronic survey was administered to pharmacy educators within acute and primary care to assess the use of WBL within clinical pharmacy education. Results: Of the 115 eligible clinical educators, 69 participated in the survey (60{\%} response rate), with the majority working within acute care; 38{\%} of educators encouraged the use of WBL. Respondents not using WBL stated a lack of awareness (48{\%}) or existing student time commitments (33{\%}) as reasons. For educators encouraging WBL, 87{\%} agreed that it enhanced student clinical knowledge, 68{\%} stated that it decreased direct instruction time commitments and 100{\%} stated they would encourage its use for future clinical education. Conclusions: Clinical pharmacy educators reported that the WBL initiative resulted in a perceived stronger student clinical foundation, and all pharmacy educators using WBL encouraged its continued use for future clinical education. Web-based learning provides clinical educators with a learning tool to augment clinical experiences by reinforcing student knowledge, at the same time minimising direct instruction time.",
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Isaacs, AN, Walton, AM, Gonzalvo, JD, Howard, ML & Nisly, SA 2019, 'Pharmacy educator evaluation of web-based learning', Clinical Teacher, vol. 16, no. 6, pp. 630-635. https://doi.org/10.1111/tct.13003

Pharmacy educator evaluation of web-based learning. / Isaacs, Alex N.; Walton, Alison M.; Gonzalvo, Jasmine D.; Howard, Meredith L.; Nisly, Sarah A.

In: Clinical Teacher, Vol. 16, No. 6, 01.12.2019, p. 630-635.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Isaacs AN, Walton AM, Gonzalvo JD, Howard ML, Nisly SA. Pharmacy educator evaluation of web-based learning. Clinical Teacher. 2019 Dec 1;16(6):630-635. https://doi.org/10.1111/tct.13003