Persistent nonmalignant pain management using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in older patients and use of inappropriate adjuvant medications

Nahid Rianon, Maureen E. Knell, Walter Agbor-Bawa, Joan Thelen, Crystal Burkhardt, Rafia S. Rasu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Due to the high risk of life-threatening side effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are not favored for treating persistent nonmalignant pain in the elderly. We report national prescription trends with determinants of NSAIDs prescription for persistent nonmalignant pain among older patients (age 65 and over) in the US outpatient setting. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis was performed using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data. Prescriptions for NSAIDs, opioids, and adjuvant agents were identifed using five-digit National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey drug codes. Results: About 89% of the 206,879,848 weighted visits in the US from 2000 to 2007 recorded NSAIDs prescriptions in patients (mean age =75.4 years). Most NSAIDs users had Medicare (75%), and about 25% were prescribed with adjuvant medications considered inappropriate for their age. Compared to men, women were 1.79 times more likely to be prescribed NSAIDs. Conclusion: The high percentage of NSAIDs prescription in older patients is alarming. We recommend investigating the appropriateness of the high prevalence of NSAIDs use among older patients reported in our study.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-50
Number of pages8
JournalDrug, Healthcare and Patient Safety
Volume7
DOIs
StatePublished - 29 Jan 2015

Keywords

  • AGS guideline
  • Inappropriate adjuvant
  • NAMCS
  • NSAIDs
  • Pain management

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