Outcomes of Cataract Surgery: Improvement in Visual Acuity and Subjective Visual Function After Surgery in the First, Second, and Both Eyes

Jonathan C. Javitt, M. Harvey Brenner, Barbara Curbow, Marcia W. Legro, Debra A. Street

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

174 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

No previous study documents improvement in visual acuity and subjective visual function associated with cataract surgery in the first eye, second eye, and both eyes. Measurement of subjective aspects of visual function and quality of life provides information that cannot be obtained with simple measurement of Snellen visual acuity. —From 76 ophthalmology practices in three cities, patients undergoing cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation (n=613) and comparison patients (n=408) were enrolled in a prospective study. Questionnaires elicited visual function information before and after surgery, and visual acuity was obtained from the ophthalmologic record. —Among patients with cataract and no other eye disease, baseline subjective visual function before surgery in the second eye was better than that before surgery in the first eye. Improvement in subjective visual function was approximately equal postoperatively in first and second eyes. Improvement in subjective function in both eyes postoperatively was significantly greater than that after surgery in the first eye or second eye alone. No statistically significant difference across surgical groups in the proportion of patients demonstrating improvement in visual acuity was observed. —Patients who underwent surgery in both eyes reported greater improvement in subjective visual function than did those who underwent surgery in one eye. Thus, there seems to be a benefit associated with restoring binocular vision in this population. These findings support the policy recommendation that cataract surgery in both eyes remains the appropriate treatment for patients with bilateral, cataract-induced visual impairment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)686-691
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Ophthalmology
Volume111
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1993

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Cataract
Visual Acuity
Binocular Vision
Intraocular Lens Implantation
Cataract Extraction
Eye Diseases
Vision Disorders
Ophthalmology
Quality of Life
Prospective Studies

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abstract = "No previous study documents improvement in visual acuity and subjective visual function associated with cataract surgery in the first eye, second eye, and both eyes. Measurement of subjective aspects of visual function and quality of life provides information that cannot be obtained with simple measurement of Snellen visual acuity. —From 76 ophthalmology practices in three cities, patients undergoing cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation (n=613) and comparison patients (n=408) were enrolled in a prospective study. Questionnaires elicited visual function information before and after surgery, and visual acuity was obtained from the ophthalmologic record. —Among patients with cataract and no other eye disease, baseline subjective visual function before surgery in the second eye was better than that before surgery in the first eye. Improvement in subjective visual function was approximately equal postoperatively in first and second eyes. Improvement in subjective function in both eyes postoperatively was significantly greater than that after surgery in the first eye or second eye alone. No statistically significant difference across surgical groups in the proportion of patients demonstrating improvement in visual acuity was observed. —Patients who underwent surgery in both eyes reported greater improvement in subjective visual function than did those who underwent surgery in one eye. Thus, there seems to be a benefit associated with restoring binocular vision in this population. These findings support the policy recommendation that cataract surgery in both eyes remains the appropriate treatment for patients with bilateral, cataract-induced visual impairment.",
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Outcomes of Cataract Surgery : Improvement in Visual Acuity and Subjective Visual Function After Surgery in the First, Second, and Both Eyes. / Javitt, Jonathan C.; Brenner, M. Harvey; Curbow, Barbara; Legro, Marcia W.; Street, Debra A.

In: Archives of Ophthalmology, Vol. 111, No. 5, 05.1993, p. 686-691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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