Normative Misperceptions of Peer Seat Belt Use Among High School Students and Their Relationship to Personal Seat Belt Use

Dana Michelle Litt, Melissa Ardelle Lewis, Jeffrey W. Linkenbach, Gary Lande, Clayton Neighbors

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This research examined gender-specific perceptions of peer seat belt use norms among high school students and their relationship with one's own seat belt use. We expected that students would underestimate the seat belt use of their peers and that these perceptions would be positively associated with their own seat belt use.Methods: High school students from 4 schools (N = 3348; 52% male) completed measures assessing perceived seat belt use and personal seat belt use.Results: Findings demonstrated that students perceived that others engaged in less seat belt use than they do and that perceived norms were positively associated with one's own seat belt use.Conclusions: Peer influences are a strong predictor of behavior, especially among adolescents. Ironically, adolescents' behaviors are often influenced by inaccurate perceptions of their peers. This research establishes the presence of a misperception related to seat belt use and suggests that misperception is associated with own behaviors. This research provides a foundation for social norms-based interventions designed to increase seat belt use by correcting normative misperceptions among adolescents.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)748-752
Number of pages5
JournalTraffic Injury Prevention
Volume15
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2014

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Seat Belts
Students
adolescent
school
student
Social Norms
Research
gender
Adolescent Behavior

Keywords

  • descriptive norms
  • gender
  • seat belt use
  • social norms

Cite this

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abstract = "Objectives: This research examined gender-specific perceptions of peer seat belt use norms among high school students and their relationship with one's own seat belt use. We expected that students would underestimate the seat belt use of their peers and that these perceptions would be positively associated with their own seat belt use.Methods: High school students from 4 schools (N = 3348; 52{\%} male) completed measures assessing perceived seat belt use and personal seat belt use.Results: Findings demonstrated that students perceived that others engaged in less seat belt use than they do and that perceived norms were positively associated with one's own seat belt use.Conclusions: Peer influences are a strong predictor of behavior, especially among adolescents. Ironically, adolescents' behaviors are often influenced by inaccurate perceptions of their peers. This research establishes the presence of a misperception related to seat belt use and suggests that misperception is associated with own behaviors. This research provides a foundation for social norms-based interventions designed to increase seat belt use by correcting normative misperceptions among adolescents.",
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Normative Misperceptions of Peer Seat Belt Use Among High School Students and Their Relationship to Personal Seat Belt Use. / Litt, Dana Michelle; Lewis, Melissa Ardelle; Linkenbach, Jeffrey W.; Lande, Gary; Neighbors, Clayton.

In: Traffic Injury Prevention, Vol. 15, No. 7, 01.01.2014, p. 748-752.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Neighbors, Clayton

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