Nitric oxide and substance dependence

I. Tayfun Uzbay, Michael W. Oglesby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

97 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The free-radical gas nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in a diverse range of physiological processes. It is synthesized from the precursor L-arginine by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), which transforms L-arginine into NO and citrulline. This synthetic pathway exists in the central nervous system (CNS), and NO appears to be a messenger molecule in the CNS, fulfilling most of the criteria of a neurotransmitter. Recent studies indicate that NO may play an important role in dependence on drugs of abuse. The purpose of this review is to address the role of NO in dependence on substances such as opioids, ethanol, psychostimulants and nicotine. Inhibitors of NOS modulate withdrawal from opioids and ethanol, diminishing many signs of withdrawal. In addition, NOS inhibitors suppress signs of withdrawal from nicotine. These data suggest that NO may be involved in the expression of withdrawal signs, and they leave open the possibility that NO may mediate the development of many of these signs. Although preliminary, data to date suggest that glutamate neurotransmission may be related to these beneficial effects of NOS inhibitors on signs of withdrawal. Emerging data further suggest that NO may have a general role in the dependence potential of various classes of drugs of abuse. Thus, modulation of NO systems may be a potential therapeutic target for treatment of substance abuse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-52
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 7 Feb 2001

Fingerprint

Substance-Related Disorders
Nitric Oxide
Nitric Oxide Synthase
Street Drugs
Nicotine
Opioid Analgesics
Arginine
Ethanol
Central Nervous System
Physiological Phenomena
Citrulline
Synaptic Transmission
Free Radicals
Neurotransmitter Agents
Glutamic Acid
Gases
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Amphetamine
  • Cocaine
  • Ethanol
  • Nicotine
  • Nitric oxide
  • Nitric oxide synthase inhibitors
  • Opioid(s)
  • Physical dependence
  • Substance abuse
  • Substance withdrawal

Cite this

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abstract = "The free-radical gas nitric oxide (NO) plays an important role in a diverse range of physiological processes. It is synthesized from the precursor L-arginine by the enzyme NO synthase (NOS), which transforms L-arginine into NO and citrulline. This synthetic pathway exists in the central nervous system (CNS), and NO appears to be a messenger molecule in the CNS, fulfilling most of the criteria of a neurotransmitter. Recent studies indicate that NO may play an important role in dependence on drugs of abuse. The purpose of this review is to address the role of NO in dependence on substances such as opioids, ethanol, psychostimulants and nicotine. Inhibitors of NOS modulate withdrawal from opioids and ethanol, diminishing many signs of withdrawal. In addition, NOS inhibitors suppress signs of withdrawal from nicotine. These data suggest that NO may be involved in the expression of withdrawal signs, and they leave open the possibility that NO may mediate the development of many of these signs. Although preliminary, data to date suggest that glutamate neurotransmission may be related to these beneficial effects of NOS inhibitors on signs of withdrawal. Emerging data further suggest that NO may have a general role in the dependence potential of various classes of drugs of abuse. Thus, modulation of NO systems may be a potential therapeutic target for treatment of substance abuse.",
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Nitric oxide and substance dependence. / Tayfun Uzbay, I.; Oglesby, Michael W.

In: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, Vol. 25, No. 1, 07.02.2001, p. 43-52.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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