“My mom said it wasn't important”: A case for catch-up human papillomavirus vaccination among young adult women in the United States

Erika L. Thompson, Alicia L. Best, Cheryl A. Vamos, Ellen M. Daley

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents HPV-related diseases, including anogenital cancers and genital warts. In the United States, while it is recommended to adolescents ages 11 to 12, catch-up vaccination is available for those previously unvaccinated until age 26. Parental decisions or lack of provider recommendation during adolescence are barriers to on-time vaccination. Young adult women, ages 18 to 26, are a key catch-up vaccination population as this is a period for autonomous decision-making, high healthcare utilization, and other recommended prevention behaviors. Additional intervention research is required to promote HPV vaccine uptake among young adult women. Evidence-based and theory-informed interventions need to be developed and evaluated to reach a large number of women. In order to improve HPV vaccination among young adult women, future research should integrate the themes of health literacy, alternative healthcare settings, and OB/GYN providers to facilitate improved access and shared decision-making for the vaccine. This last chance for HPV-related cancer prevention should not be forgotten in public health efforts.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-4
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Human papillomavirus
  • Immunization
  • Women
  • Young adult

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