Measurement of C-reactive protein for the targeting of statin therapy in the primary prevention of acute coronary events

Paul M. Ridker, Nader Rifai, Michael Clearfield, John R. Downs, Stephen E. Weis, J. Shawn Miles, Antonio M. Gotto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1381 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein, even in the absence of hyperlipidemia, are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Statin therapy reduces the level of C-reactive protein independently of its effect on lipid levels. We hypothesized that statins might prevent coronary events in persons with elevated C-reactive protein levels who did not have overt hyperlipidemia. Methods: The level of C-reactive protein was measured at base line and after one year in 5742 participants in a five-year randomized trial of lovastatin for the primary prevention of acute coronary events. Results: The rates of coronary events increased significantly with increases in the base-line levels of C-reactive protein. Lovastatin therapy reduced the C-reactive protein level by 14.8 percent (P<0.001), an effect not explained by lovastatin-induced changes in the lipid profile. As expected, lovastatin was effective in preventing coronary events in participants whose base-line ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was higher than the median ratio, regardless of the level of C-reactive protein (number needed to treat for five years to prevent 1 event, 47; P=0.005). However, lovastatin was also effective among those with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol that was lower than the median and a C-reactive protein level higher than the median (number needed to treat, 43; P=0.02). In contrast, lovastatin was ineffective among participants with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol and a C-reactive protein level that were both lower than the median (number needed to treat, 983; P=0.87). Conclusions: Statin therapy may be effective in the primary prevention of coronary events among persons with relatively low lipid levels but with elevated levels of C-reactive protein.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1959-1965
Number of pages7
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume344
Issue number26
DOIs
StatePublished - 28 Jun 2001

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Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
Protein Transport
Primary Prevention
C-Reactive Protein
Lovastatin
Numbers Needed To Treat
HDL Cholesterol
Therapeutics
Hyperlipidemias
Lipids
Lipoprotein(a)
Base Composition
Cholesterol

Cite this

Ridker, Paul M. ; Rifai, Nader ; Clearfield, Michael ; Downs, John R. ; Weis, Stephen E. ; Miles, J. Shawn ; Gotto, Antonio M. / Measurement of C-reactive protein for the targeting of statin therapy in the primary prevention of acute coronary events. In: New England Journal of Medicine. 2001 ; Vol. 344, No. 26. pp. 1959-1965.
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title = "Measurement of C-reactive protein for the targeting of statin therapy in the primary prevention of acute coronary events",
abstract = "Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein, even in the absence of hyperlipidemia, are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Statin therapy reduces the level of C-reactive protein independently of its effect on lipid levels. We hypothesized that statins might prevent coronary events in persons with elevated C-reactive protein levels who did not have overt hyperlipidemia. Methods: The level of C-reactive protein was measured at base line and after one year in 5742 participants in a five-year randomized trial of lovastatin for the primary prevention of acute coronary events. Results: The rates of coronary events increased significantly with increases in the base-line levels of C-reactive protein. Lovastatin therapy reduced the C-reactive protein level by 14.8 percent (P<0.001), an effect not explained by lovastatin-induced changes in the lipid profile. As expected, lovastatin was effective in preventing coronary events in participants whose base-line ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was higher than the median ratio, regardless of the level of C-reactive protein (number needed to treat for five years to prevent 1 event, 47; P=0.005). However, lovastatin was also effective among those with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol that was lower than the median and a C-reactive protein level higher than the median (number needed to treat, 43; P=0.02). In contrast, lovastatin was ineffective among participants with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol and a C-reactive protein level that were both lower than the median (number needed to treat, 983; P=0.87). Conclusions: Statin therapy may be effective in the primary prevention of coronary events among persons with relatively low lipid levels but with elevated levels of C-reactive protein.",
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Measurement of C-reactive protein for the targeting of statin therapy in the primary prevention of acute coronary events. / Ridker, Paul M.; Rifai, Nader; Clearfield, Michael; Downs, John R.; Weis, Stephen E.; Miles, J. Shawn; Gotto, Antonio M.

In: New England Journal of Medicine, Vol. 344, No. 26, 28.06.2001, p. 1959-1965.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Measurement of C-reactive protein for the targeting of statin therapy in the primary prevention of acute coronary events

AU - Ridker, Paul M.

AU - Rifai, Nader

AU - Clearfield, Michael

AU - Downs, John R.

AU - Weis, Stephen E.

AU - Miles, J. Shawn

AU - Gotto, Antonio M.

PY - 2001/6/28

Y1 - 2001/6/28

N2 - Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein, even in the absence of hyperlipidemia, are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Statin therapy reduces the level of C-reactive protein independently of its effect on lipid levels. We hypothesized that statins might prevent coronary events in persons with elevated C-reactive protein levels who did not have overt hyperlipidemia. Methods: The level of C-reactive protein was measured at base line and after one year in 5742 participants in a five-year randomized trial of lovastatin for the primary prevention of acute coronary events. Results: The rates of coronary events increased significantly with increases in the base-line levels of C-reactive protein. Lovastatin therapy reduced the C-reactive protein level by 14.8 percent (P<0.001), an effect not explained by lovastatin-induced changes in the lipid profile. As expected, lovastatin was effective in preventing coronary events in participants whose base-line ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was higher than the median ratio, regardless of the level of C-reactive protein (number needed to treat for five years to prevent 1 event, 47; P=0.005). However, lovastatin was also effective among those with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol that was lower than the median and a C-reactive protein level higher than the median (number needed to treat, 43; P=0.02). In contrast, lovastatin was ineffective among participants with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol and a C-reactive protein level that were both lower than the median (number needed to treat, 983; P=0.87). Conclusions: Statin therapy may be effective in the primary prevention of coronary events among persons with relatively low lipid levels but with elevated levels of C-reactive protein.

AB - Background: Elevated levels of C-reactive protein, even in the absence of hyperlipidemia, are associated with an increased risk of coronary events. Statin therapy reduces the level of C-reactive protein independently of its effect on lipid levels. We hypothesized that statins might prevent coronary events in persons with elevated C-reactive protein levels who did not have overt hyperlipidemia. Methods: The level of C-reactive protein was measured at base line and after one year in 5742 participants in a five-year randomized trial of lovastatin for the primary prevention of acute coronary events. Results: The rates of coronary events increased significantly with increases in the base-line levels of C-reactive protein. Lovastatin therapy reduced the C-reactive protein level by 14.8 percent (P<0.001), an effect not explained by lovastatin-induced changes in the lipid profile. As expected, lovastatin was effective in preventing coronary events in participants whose base-line ratio of total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol was higher than the median ratio, regardless of the level of C-reactive protein (number needed to treat for five years to prevent 1 event, 47; P=0.005). However, lovastatin was also effective among those with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol that was lower than the median and a C-reactive protein level higher than the median (number needed to treat, 43; P=0.02). In contrast, lovastatin was ineffective among participants with a ratio of total to HDL cholesterol and a C-reactive protein level that were both lower than the median (number needed to treat, 983; P=0.87). Conclusions: Statin therapy may be effective in the primary prevention of coronary events among persons with relatively low lipid levels but with elevated levels of C-reactive protein.

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U2 - 10.1056/NEJM200106283442601

DO - 10.1056/NEJM200106283442601

M3 - Article

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AN - SCOPUS:0035963529

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SP - 1959

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JO - New England Journal of Medicine

JF - New England Journal of Medicine

SN - 0028-4793

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