Manual Therapy Treatment for Penile Pain- A Clinical Case Report with 6-Month Follow-up

Yingzhi Li, Howe Liu, Charles Wayne Nichols, David C. Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Male genital pain, which is neither related to genitourinary nor other obvious pathology, is an uncommon symptom in male patients and not frequently treated using manual therapy. The purpose of this case study is to describe a clinical reasoning process in combination with anatomy-based differential diagnosis and manual treatment for genital pain. Case Description: A male patient with a 3-week acute onset of genital pain was hospitalized and referred for evaluation and treatment after unsuccessful treatment with medication and acupuncture. Clinical examination was performed indicating a possible nerve entrapment followed by interventions of ligamentous articular strain, high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) manipulation, and strain– and counterstain, coupled with soft tissue stretching to lumbar and inguinal areas to address a possible lumbar referral potentially from L1 and/or ilioinguinal nerve entrapment. Outcomes: After 4 consecutive days of manipulative treatment, pain decreased from 9/10 to 0/10 and the Barthel Index improved from 50 to 95. A 6-month follow-up revealed complete resolution of symptoms with no recurrence. Discussion: This case illustrates that a detailed history and examination along with a reasoned diagnostic process to determine an appropriate intervention strategy may improve patient care using manual therapy techniques. Conclusion: By utilizing a deductive reasoning process related to the penile area, clinicians may better apply manual therapy techniques for successful treatment.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • nerve pain
  • Penis
  • physical therapy
  • soft tissue mobilization
  • spinal manipulation

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