Levels of acculturation and effect on glycemic control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes

Sarah Elizabeth Ross, Susan Faye Franks, James Hall, Richard Young, Roberto Cardarelli

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Acculturation of Mexican Americans toward the predominant American culture has been shown to influence health outcomes. Little is known about the role of acculturation in diabetes control. Objective: To measure the association between acculturation and diabetes control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design: Cross-sectional survey and chart review. Setting: Ambulatory family medicine clinics. Patients: Sixty-six Mexican and Mexican American adults with T2DM for $ 1 year. Instrument and Outcomes: A survey tool was developed that included the General Acculturation Index developed by Balcazar et al to measure acculturation. Basic demographics, psychosocial factors, patient satisfaction, and patients' most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were also obtained. Results: There was no significant correlation between acculturation score and HbA1c levels. On binary logistic regression, HbA1c levels were associated with patient satisfaction in having their questions answered (odds ratio [OR], 0.44; P, 0.05), interference of diabetes with daily life (OR, 1.4; P, 0.05), male gender (OR, 3.93; P, 0.01), and number of diabetes complications (OR, 1.81; P, 0.05). In the multivariate linear regression model, age (beta, -0.348; P, 0.05) and frequency of physician visits (beta, -0.403; P, 0.05) were the only variables significantly associated with glycemic control. Variables included in the model that were not associated with glycemic control include family history of diabetes and confidence in diabetes treatment efficacy. Conclusions: Acculturation was not associated with glycemic control in this population. Family physicians should not assume that acculturation difficulties explain poor glycemic control in their Mexican American patients with T2DM.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-72
Number of pages7
JournalPostgraduate Medicine
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2011

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Odds Ratio
Hemoglobins
Patient Satisfaction
Linear Models
Family Physicians
Diabetes Complications
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Medicine
Demography
Psychology
Physicians
Health

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Glycemic control
  • Hemoglobin A
  • Mexican
  • Mexican Americans
  • Type 2 diabetes mellitus

Cite this

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title = "Levels of acculturation and effect on glycemic control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Background: Acculturation of Mexican Americans toward the predominant American culture has been shown to influence health outcomes. Little is known about the role of acculturation in diabetes control. Objective: To measure the association between acculturation and diabetes control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design: Cross-sectional survey and chart review. Setting: Ambulatory family medicine clinics. Patients: Sixty-six Mexican and Mexican American adults with T2DM for $ 1 year. Instrument and Outcomes: A survey tool was developed that included the General Acculturation Index developed by Balcazar et al to measure acculturation. Basic demographics, psychosocial factors, patient satisfaction, and patients' most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were also obtained. Results: There was no significant correlation between acculturation score and HbA1c levels. On binary logistic regression, HbA1c levels were associated with patient satisfaction in having their questions answered (odds ratio [OR], 0.44; P, 0.05), interference of diabetes with daily life (OR, 1.4; P, 0.05), male gender (OR, 3.93; P, 0.01), and number of diabetes complications (OR, 1.81; P, 0.05). In the multivariate linear regression model, age (beta, -0.348; P, 0.05) and frequency of physician visits (beta, -0.403; P, 0.05) were the only variables significantly associated with glycemic control. Variables included in the model that were not associated with glycemic control include family history of diabetes and confidence in diabetes treatment efficacy. Conclusions: Acculturation was not associated with glycemic control in this population. Family physicians should not assume that acculturation difficulties explain poor glycemic control in their Mexican American patients with T2DM.",
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Levels of acculturation and effect on glycemic control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes. / Ross, Sarah Elizabeth; Franks, Susan Faye; Hall, James; Young, Richard; Cardarelli, Roberto.

In: Postgraduate Medicine, Vol. 123, No. 1, 01.01.2011, p. 66-72.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Franks, Susan Faye

AU - Hall, James

AU - Young, Richard

AU - Cardarelli, Roberto

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N2 - Background: Acculturation of Mexican Americans toward the predominant American culture has been shown to influence health outcomes. Little is known about the role of acculturation in diabetes control. Objective: To measure the association between acculturation and diabetes control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design: Cross-sectional survey and chart review. Setting: Ambulatory family medicine clinics. Patients: Sixty-six Mexican and Mexican American adults with T2DM for $ 1 year. Instrument and Outcomes: A survey tool was developed that included the General Acculturation Index developed by Balcazar et al to measure acculturation. Basic demographics, psychosocial factors, patient satisfaction, and patients' most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were also obtained. Results: There was no significant correlation between acculturation score and HbA1c levels. On binary logistic regression, HbA1c levels were associated with patient satisfaction in having their questions answered (odds ratio [OR], 0.44; P, 0.05), interference of diabetes with daily life (OR, 1.4; P, 0.05), male gender (OR, 3.93; P, 0.01), and number of diabetes complications (OR, 1.81; P, 0.05). In the multivariate linear regression model, age (beta, -0.348; P, 0.05) and frequency of physician visits (beta, -0.403; P, 0.05) were the only variables significantly associated with glycemic control. Variables included in the model that were not associated with glycemic control include family history of diabetes and confidence in diabetes treatment efficacy. Conclusions: Acculturation was not associated with glycemic control in this population. Family physicians should not assume that acculturation difficulties explain poor glycemic control in their Mexican American patients with T2DM.

AB - Background: Acculturation of Mexican Americans toward the predominant American culture has been shown to influence health outcomes. Little is known about the role of acculturation in diabetes control. Objective: To measure the association between acculturation and diabetes control in Mexicans and Mexican Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Design: Cross-sectional survey and chart review. Setting: Ambulatory family medicine clinics. Patients: Sixty-six Mexican and Mexican American adults with T2DM for $ 1 year. Instrument and Outcomes: A survey tool was developed that included the General Acculturation Index developed by Balcazar et al to measure acculturation. Basic demographics, psychosocial factors, patient satisfaction, and patients' most recent hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were also obtained. Results: There was no significant correlation between acculturation score and HbA1c levels. On binary logistic regression, HbA1c levels were associated with patient satisfaction in having their questions answered (odds ratio [OR], 0.44; P, 0.05), interference of diabetes with daily life (OR, 1.4; P, 0.05), male gender (OR, 3.93; P, 0.01), and number of diabetes complications (OR, 1.81; P, 0.05). In the multivariate linear regression model, age (beta, -0.348; P, 0.05) and frequency of physician visits (beta, -0.403; P, 0.05) were the only variables significantly associated with glycemic control. Variables included in the model that were not associated with glycemic control include family history of diabetes and confidence in diabetes treatment efficacy. Conclusions: Acculturation was not associated with glycemic control in this population. Family physicians should not assume that acculturation difficulties explain poor glycemic control in their Mexican American patients with T2DM.

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