Is Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Use Increasing? Assessing Trends Among U.S. College Women, 2008–2013

Rachel G. Logan, Erika Lynne Thompson, Cheryl A. Vamos, Stacey Barrett Griner, Coralia Vázquez-Otero, Ellen M. Daley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To assess LARC use trends among college women (18–24 years) and identify groups that have increased LARC use. Methods Data were extracted from the National College Health Assessment-II (NCHA-II) fall 2008–2013 surveys. Logistic regression statistics were used to assess LARC use. Results Although LARC use increased from 2008 to 2013 (aOR = 2.62; 95% CI 2.23–3.07), less than half of the sample (44%) reported using contraception at last vaginal sex. Only 2.5% of college women in this study reported using a LARC method; of LARC users, 90% reported using an intrauterine device. Nearly all sociodemographic factors were significantly associated with increases in LARC use including: age, sexual orientation, and insurance status. Conclusions LARC use significantly increased among college women. However, less effective methods such as condoms and short-acting reversible contraceptives are used more frequently. Promoting LARC use for women who desire to effectively prevent pregnancy can reduce unintended pregnancy and improve health outcomes for women while in college. Future work should examine the importance of individual and lifestyle factors that influence college women’s decision to choose a LARC method and seek to eliminate barriers to college women choosing a contraceptive method they believe works best for them.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1639-1646
Number of pages8
JournalMaternal and Child Health Journal
Volume22
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

Contraceptive Agents
Contraception
Pregnancy
Intrauterine Devices
Insurance Coverage
Condoms
Women's Health
Sexual Behavior
Life Style
Logistic Models
Health

Keywords

  • Birth control
  • College women
  • LARC
  • Long-acting reversible contraception
  • NCHA
  • Unintended pregnancy

Cite this

Logan, Rachel G. ; Thompson, Erika Lynne ; Vamos, Cheryl A. ; Griner, Stacey Barrett ; Vázquez-Otero, Coralia ; Daley, Ellen M. / Is Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Use Increasing? Assessing Trends Among U.S. College Women, 2008–2013. In: Maternal and Child Health Journal. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 11. pp. 1639-1646.
@article{d1b14164aad84a89a363c3a2f2017c05,
title = "Is Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Use Increasing? Assessing Trends Among U.S. College Women, 2008–2013",
abstract = "Objective To assess LARC use trends among college women (18–24 years) and identify groups that have increased LARC use. Methods Data were extracted from the National College Health Assessment-II (NCHA-II) fall 2008–2013 surveys. Logistic regression statistics were used to assess LARC use. Results Although LARC use increased from 2008 to 2013 (aOR = 2.62; 95{\%} CI 2.23–3.07), less than half of the sample (44{\%}) reported using contraception at last vaginal sex. Only 2.5{\%} of college women in this study reported using a LARC method; of LARC users, 90{\%} reported using an intrauterine device. Nearly all sociodemographic factors were significantly associated with increases in LARC use including: age, sexual orientation, and insurance status. Conclusions LARC use significantly increased among college women. However, less effective methods such as condoms and short-acting reversible contraceptives are used more frequently. Promoting LARC use for women who desire to effectively prevent pregnancy can reduce unintended pregnancy and improve health outcomes for women while in college. Future work should examine the importance of individual and lifestyle factors that influence college women’s decision to choose a LARC method and seek to eliminate barriers to college women choosing a contraceptive method they believe works best for them.",
keywords = "Birth control, College women, LARC, Long-acting reversible contraception, NCHA, Unintended pregnancy",
author = "Logan, {Rachel G.} and Thompson, {Erika Lynne} and Vamos, {Cheryl A.} and Griner, {Stacey Barrett} and Coralia V{\'a}zquez-Otero and Daley, {Ellen M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10995-018-2560-8",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "1639--1646",
journal = "Maternal and Child Health Journal",
issn = "1092-7875",
publisher = "Springer GmbH & Co, Auslieferungs-Gesellschaf",
number = "11",

}

Is Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Use Increasing? Assessing Trends Among U.S. College Women, 2008–2013. / Logan, Rachel G.; Thompson, Erika Lynne; Vamos, Cheryl A.; Griner, Stacey Barrett; Vázquez-Otero, Coralia; Daley, Ellen M.

In: Maternal and Child Health Journal, Vol. 22, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1639-1646.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Use Increasing? Assessing Trends Among U.S. College Women, 2008–2013

AU - Logan, Rachel G.

AU - Thompson, Erika Lynne

AU - Vamos, Cheryl A.

AU - Griner, Stacey Barrett

AU - Vázquez-Otero, Coralia

AU - Daley, Ellen M.

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Objective To assess LARC use trends among college women (18–24 years) and identify groups that have increased LARC use. Methods Data were extracted from the National College Health Assessment-II (NCHA-II) fall 2008–2013 surveys. Logistic regression statistics were used to assess LARC use. Results Although LARC use increased from 2008 to 2013 (aOR = 2.62; 95% CI 2.23–3.07), less than half of the sample (44%) reported using contraception at last vaginal sex. Only 2.5% of college women in this study reported using a LARC method; of LARC users, 90% reported using an intrauterine device. Nearly all sociodemographic factors were significantly associated with increases in LARC use including: age, sexual orientation, and insurance status. Conclusions LARC use significantly increased among college women. However, less effective methods such as condoms and short-acting reversible contraceptives are used more frequently. Promoting LARC use for women who desire to effectively prevent pregnancy can reduce unintended pregnancy and improve health outcomes for women while in college. Future work should examine the importance of individual and lifestyle factors that influence college women’s decision to choose a LARC method and seek to eliminate barriers to college women choosing a contraceptive method they believe works best for them.

AB - Objective To assess LARC use trends among college women (18–24 years) and identify groups that have increased LARC use. Methods Data were extracted from the National College Health Assessment-II (NCHA-II) fall 2008–2013 surveys. Logistic regression statistics were used to assess LARC use. Results Although LARC use increased from 2008 to 2013 (aOR = 2.62; 95% CI 2.23–3.07), less than half of the sample (44%) reported using contraception at last vaginal sex. Only 2.5% of college women in this study reported using a LARC method; of LARC users, 90% reported using an intrauterine device. Nearly all sociodemographic factors were significantly associated with increases in LARC use including: age, sexual orientation, and insurance status. Conclusions LARC use significantly increased among college women. However, less effective methods such as condoms and short-acting reversible contraceptives are used more frequently. Promoting LARC use for women who desire to effectively prevent pregnancy can reduce unintended pregnancy and improve health outcomes for women while in college. Future work should examine the importance of individual and lifestyle factors that influence college women’s decision to choose a LARC method and seek to eliminate barriers to college women choosing a contraceptive method they believe works best for them.

KW - Birth control

KW - College women

KW - LARC

KW - Long-acting reversible contraception

KW - NCHA

KW - Unintended pregnancy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85049009875&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10995-018-2560-8

DO - 10.1007/s10995-018-2560-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 29936659

AN - SCOPUS:85049009875

VL - 22

SP - 1639

EP - 1646

JO - Maternal and Child Health Journal

JF - Maternal and Child Health Journal

SN - 1092-7875

IS - 11

ER -