Haloperidol plasma concentrations in Taiwanese psychiatric patients

H. Y. Lane, H. N. Lin, H. G. Hwu, Michael Wong Jann, W. H. Hu, W. H. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Haloperidol and reduced haloperidol are interconverted. The plasma concentrations of these two butyrophenones have been suggested to be important factors in determining the clinical effect of haloperidol treatment. The steady-state plasma concentrations of haloperidol and reduced haloperidol were measured in 322 Taiwanese schizophrenic patients using high performance liquid chromatography. The daily doses of haloperidol varied from 5 to 200 mg (mean ± SD, 35.3 ± 34.6 mg). There was a positive correlation between plasma concentrations and doses, following the equation: haloperidol concentration (ng/mL) = 0.88 x dose (mg/day) - 1.66. However, the interpatient variation in haloperidol concentrations was up to ten-fold even in patients receiving the same dose (20 mg/day, n = 88. The expected values were about 10% to 50% higher than those reported in Caucasian patients. The plasma reduced haloperidol concentrations were significantly lower than, and correlated with, those of haloperidol in patients with haloperidol levels lower than 25 ng/mL. However, once haloperidol exceeded 25 ng/mL, reduced haloperidol levels rapidly elevated and appeared significantly higher than haloperidol levels. While haloperidol could reach its steady state in about 1 week, reduced haloperidol needed at least 4 weeks to do so. Haloperidol doses of less than 30 mg/day and plasma concentrations lower than 25 ng/mL are recommended for most Chinese patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)671-678
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Formosan Medical Association
Volume94
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1995

Keywords

  • haloperidol
  • plasma concentrations
  • reduced-form haloperidol
  • schizophrenia

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