Genetic heterogeneity and population structure in eastern India: red cell enzyme variability in ten Assamese populations.

B. N. Mukherjee, K. C. Malhotra, M. Roy, S. Banerjee, H. Walter, Ranajit Chakraborty

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Abstract

This paper is a part of the genetic study of the people of Assam (eastern India), initiated by the Anthropometry and Human Genetics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Calcutta, India, and the Dept. of Human Biology/Physical Anthropology, University of Bremen, W. Germany. The results of 1. allele distribution of five red cell enzyme polymorphisms in ten Assamese populations, 2. heterogeneity of allele frequencies and extent of gene differentiation among these populations, and 3. standard genetic distances are presented here. A total of 1024 blood samples was screened for aP, E D, AK, ADA and LDH enzyme systems for Brahmins, Kalitas, Kaibartas, Rajbanshis, Muslims, Ahoms, Chutiyas, Kacharis, Karbis (Mikirs) and Sonowals, of which the latter three are tribes. The gene diversity (FST) is smallest (0.0035) for pa and highest (0.1604) for HbE. The total FST value (0.0399 +/- 0.0141) appears to be statistically significant. From distance analysis two major clusters with sub-clusters in each are visible, which are in conformity with the ethnohistory of these populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)287-296
Number of pages10
JournalZeitschrift fur Morphologie und Anthropologie
Volume77
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1989

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    Mukherjee, B. N., Malhotra, K. C., Roy, M., Banerjee, S., Walter, H., & Chakraborty, R. (1989). Genetic heterogeneity and population structure in eastern India: red cell enzyme variability in ten Assamese populations. Zeitschrift fur Morphologie und Anthropologie, 77(3), 287-296.