Field evaluation of CDC gravid trap attractants to primary West Nile virus vectors, Culex mosquitoes in New York State

Joon-Hak Lee, John E. Kokas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A field study was conducted to evaluate two CDC gravid trap attractants available for the West Nile virus surveillance program in New York State (NYS). According to potential attractiveness, a common lawn sod in NYS, Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) infusion and a rabbit chow infusion were compared for attractiveness to primary West Nile virus vectors, Culex mosquitoes. Attractiveness of each infusion was measured by the number of adult mosquitoes caught in CDC gravid traps and the number of egg rafts laid in ovitraps. Both gravid trap and ovitrap studies demonstrated that lawn sod infusion with a 7-day incubation period had better attractiveness to Culex restuans/Culex pipiens than rabbit chow infusion with the same incubation period. Attractiveness of lawn sod infusions was increased as they became aged within a week's period. Lawn sod infusion also attracted more Ochlerotatus japonicus, a potentially important West Nile virus vector in New York.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)248-253
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Mosquito Control Association
Volume20
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2004

Fingerprint

West Nile virus
Culex
attractant
attractants
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Poa
mosquito
ovitraps
Culicidae
Poa pratensis
traps
Ochlerotatus
Ochlerotatus japonicus
Culex restuans
incubation
rabbits
Rabbits
Culex pipiens
Ovum
egg

Keywords

  • Attractants
  • CDC gravid trap
  • Culex mosquitoes
  • New York State
  • West Nile virus vector

Cite this

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