Exploring the intersection of neighborhood racial and economic composition and individual race on substance use among male adolescents

Courtney Cronley, Helene R. White, Eun Young Mun, Chioun Lee, Andrea Finlay, Rolf Loeber

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines how Blacks and Whites living in neighborhoods with divergent racial and income profiles differed in early onset (by age 14 years) and adolescent lifetime prevalence (by age 18 years) of substance use, with longitudinal data from 473 high-risk boys (58% Black). A latent profile analysis identified four neighborhood classes: Black, lower-income; racially mixed, middle-income; White, middle-income; and White, upper-income. Bivariate analyses showed that Blacks living in racially mixed, middle-income neighborhoods reported the lowest rates of tobacco and marijuana use. Whites living in White, upper-income neighborhoods reported higher substance use prevalence, particularly marijuana. Findings suggest that substance use prevention efforts are critical for Whites in upper-income communities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)52-74
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Economics
adolescent
income
economics
Cannabis
Tobacco Use
nicotine
Age of Onset
low income
community

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • neighborhood racial composition
  • race
  • substance use

Cite this

Cronley, Courtney ; White, Helene R. ; Mun, Eun Young ; Lee, Chioun ; Finlay, Andrea ; Loeber, Rolf. / Exploring the intersection of neighborhood racial and economic composition and individual race on substance use among male adolescents. In: Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse. 2012 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 52-74.
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Exploring the intersection of neighborhood racial and economic composition and individual race on substance use among male adolescents. / Cronley, Courtney; White, Helene R.; Mun, Eun Young; Lee, Chioun; Finlay, Andrea; Loeber, Rolf.

In: Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse, Vol. 11, No. 1, 01.01.2012, p. 52-74.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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