Exercise Training Improves Microvascular Function in Burn Injury Survivors

Steven A. Romero, Gilbert Moralez, Manall F. Jaffery, M. U. Huang, Rachel E. Engelland, Matthew N. Cramer, Craig G. Crandall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introduction Vasodilator function is impaired in individuals with well-healed burn injuries; however, therapeutic interventions that lessen or reverse this maladaptation are lacking. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a 6-month community-based exercise training program would increase microvascular dilator function in individuals with well-healed burn injuries, irrespective of the magnitude of the injured body surface area. Further, we hypothesize that macrovascular dilator function would remain unchanged posttraining. Methods Microvascular function (forearm reactive hyperemia), macrovascular function (brachial artery flow-mediated dilation), and the maximal vasodilatory response after ischemic handgrip exercise (an estimate of microvascular remodeling) were assessed before and after exercise training in nonburned control subjects (n = 11) and individuals with burn injuries covering a moderate body surface area (26% ± 7%; n = 13) and a high body surface area (59% ± 15%; n = 19). Results Peak vascular conductance and area under the curve during postocclusive reactive hyperemia increased from pretraining to posttraining in control and burn injury groups (both P < 0.05), the magnitude of which did not differ between groups (both P = 0.6). Likewise, the maximal vasodilatory response after ischemic handgrip exercise increased in all groups after exercise training (P < 0.05). Macrovascular dilator function did not differ across time or between groups (P = 0.8). Conclusions These data suggest that a community-based exercise training program improves microvascular function in individuals with well-healed burn injuries, which may be due in part to vascular remodeling.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2430-2436
Number of pages7
JournalMedicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
Volume52
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • FLOW-MEDIATED DILATION
  • ISCHEMIC HANDGRIP EXERCISE
  • REACTIVE HYPEREMIA
  • VASCULAR CONDUCTANCE

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Exercise Training Improves Microvascular Function in Burn Injury Survivors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this