Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women

Jill A. Kanaley, Styliani Goulopoulou, Ruth Franklin, Tracy Baynard, Robert L. Carhart, Ruth S. Weinstock, Bo Fernhall

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Materials/Methods: Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-min IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Results: Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAPREC) than men pre- and post-training (P < 0.05). Men showed a greater reduction in diastolic BP during recovery from IHG (P < 0.05), and exercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: - 13.9 ± 1.8, post-training: - 20.5 ± 5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: - 10.7 ± 1.7, post-training: - 4.1 ± 4.9 mmHg; P < 0.05). Men had a greater reduction in sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone (P < 0.05), as estimated by blood pressure variability, following IHG. This response was accentuated after training, while this training effect was not seen in women. Post-training ΔMAPREC was correlated with recovery of low frequency component of the BP spectrum (ΔLFSBPrec, r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Differences in BP recovery immediately following IHG may be attributed to gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. An improvement in these responses occurs following aerobic exercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1739-1746
Number of pages8
JournalMetabolism: Clinical and Experimental
Volume61
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Hemodynamics
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Myocardial Ischemia
Arterial Pressure
Education
Mortality

Keywords

  • Blood pressure variability
  • Exercise
  • Mean arterial pressure

Cite this

Kanaley, Jill A. ; Goulopoulou, Styliani ; Franklin, Ruth ; Baynard, Tracy ; Carhart, Robert L. ; Weinstock, Ruth S. ; Fernhall, Bo. / Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women. In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental. 2012 ; Vol. 61, No. 12. pp. 1739-1746.
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abstract = "Objectives: Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Materials/Methods: Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-min IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Results: Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAPREC) than men pre- and post-training (P < 0.05). Men showed a greater reduction in diastolic BP during recovery from IHG (P < 0.05), and exercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: - 13.9 ± 1.8, post-training: - 20.5 ± 5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: - 10.7 ± 1.7, post-training: - 4.1 ± 4.9 mmHg; P < 0.05). Men had a greater reduction in sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone (P < 0.05), as estimated by blood pressure variability, following IHG. This response was accentuated after training, while this training effect was not seen in women. Post-training ΔMAPREC was correlated with recovery of low frequency component of the BP spectrum (ΔLFSBPrec, r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Differences in BP recovery immediately following IHG may be attributed to gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. An improvement in these responses occurs following aerobic exercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training.",
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Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women. / Kanaley, Jill A.; Goulopoulou, Styliani; Franklin, Ruth; Baynard, Tracy; Carhart, Robert L.; Weinstock, Ruth S.; Fernhall, Bo.

In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 61, No. 12, 01.12.2012, p. 1739-1746.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Exercise training improves hemodynamic recovery to isometric exercise in obese men with type 2 diabetes but not in obese women

AU - Kanaley, Jill A.

AU - Goulopoulou, Styliani

AU - Franklin, Ruth

AU - Baynard, Tracy

AU - Carhart, Robert L.

AU - Weinstock, Ruth S.

AU - Fernhall, Bo

PY - 2012/12/1

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N2 - Objectives: Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Materials/Methods: Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-min IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Results: Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAPREC) than men pre- and post-training (P < 0.05). Men showed a greater reduction in diastolic BP during recovery from IHG (P < 0.05), and exercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: - 13.9 ± 1.8, post-training: - 20.5 ± 5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: - 10.7 ± 1.7, post-training: - 4.1 ± 4.9 mmHg; P < 0.05). Men had a greater reduction in sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone (P < 0.05), as estimated by blood pressure variability, following IHG. This response was accentuated after training, while this training effect was not seen in women. Post-training ΔMAPREC was correlated with recovery of low frequency component of the BP spectrum (ΔLFSBPrec, r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Differences in BP recovery immediately following IHG may be attributed to gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. An improvement in these responses occurs following aerobic exercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training.

AB - Objectives: Women with type 2 diabetes (T2D) show greater rates of mortality due to ischemic heart disease than men with T2D. We aimed to examine cardiovascular and autonomic function responses to isometric handgrip (IHG) exercise between men and women with T2D, before and after an exercise training program. Materials/Methods: Hemodynamic responses were measured in 22 men and women with T2D during and following a 3-min IHG test, and before and after 16 wks of aerobic exercise training. Results: Women had a smaller decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and systolic blood pressure (BP) during recovery from IHG (ΔMAPREC) than men pre- and post-training (P < 0.05). Men showed a greater reduction in diastolic BP during recovery from IHG (P < 0.05), and exercise training improved this response in men but not in women (men, pre-training: - 13.9 ± 1.8, post-training: - 20.5 ± 5.3 mmHg vs. women, pre-training: - 10.7 ± 1.7, post-training: - 4.1 ± 4.9 mmHg; P < 0.05). Men had a greater reduction in sympathetic modulation of vasomotor tone (P < 0.05), as estimated by blood pressure variability, following IHG. This response was accentuated after training, while this training effect was not seen in women. Post-training ΔMAPREC was correlated with recovery of low frequency component of the BP spectrum (ΔLFSBPrec, r = 0.52, P < 0.05). Conclusions: Differences in BP recovery immediately following IHG may be attributed to gender differences in cardiovascular autonomic modulation. An improvement in these responses occurs following aerobic exercise training in obese men, but not in obese women with T2D which reflects a better adaptive autonomic response to exercise training.

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KW - Exercise

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