Evidence of a broad histamine footprint on the human exercise transcriptome

Steven A. Romero, Austin D. Hocker, Joshua E. Mangum, Meredith J. Luttrell, Douglas W. Turnbull, Adam J. Struck, Matthew R. Ely, Dylan C. Sieck, Hans C. Dreyer, John R. Halliwill

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20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Histamine is a primordial signalling molecule, capable of activating cells in an autocrine or paracrine fashion via specific cell surface receptors, in a variety of pathways that probably predate its more recent role in innate and adaptive immunity. Although histamine is normally associated with pathological conditions or allergic and anaphylactic reactions, it may contribute beneficially to the normal changes that occur within skeletal muscle during the recovery from exercise. We show that the human response to exercise includes an altered expression of thousands of protein-coding genes, and much of this response appears to be driven by histamine. Histamine may be an important molecular transducer contributing to many of the adaptations that accompany chronic exercise training. Histamine is a primordial signalling molecule, capable of activating cells in an autocrine or paracrine fashion via specific cell surface receptors. In humans, aerobic exercise is followed by a post-exercise activation of histamine H1 and H2 receptors localized to the previously exercised muscle. This could trigger a broad range of cellular adaptations in response to exercise. Thus, we exploited RNA sequencing to explore the effects of H1 and H2 receptor blockade on the exercise transcriptome in human skeletal muscle tissue harvested from the vastus lateralis. We found that exercise exerts a profound influence on the human transcriptome, causing the differential expression of more than 3000 protein-coding genes. The influence of histamine blockade post-exercise was notable for 795 genes that were differentially expressed between the control and blockade condition, which represents >25% of the number responding to exercise. The broad histamine footprint on the human exercise transcriptome crosses many cellular functions, including inflammation, vascular function, metabolism, and cellular maintenance.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5009-5023
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume594
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2016

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    Romero, S. A., Hocker, A. D., Mangum, J. E., Luttrell, M. J., Turnbull, D. W., Struck, A. J., Ely, M. R., Sieck, D. C., Dreyer, H. C., & Halliwill, J. R. (2016). Evidence of a broad histamine footprint on the human exercise transcriptome. Journal of Physiology, 594(17), 5009-5023. https://doi.org/10.1113/JP272177