Electronic cigarette explosion and burn injuries, US Emergency Departments 2015-2017

Matthew E. Rossheim, Melvin D. Livingston, Eric K. Soule, Helen A. Zeraye, Dennis L. Thombs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) battery failure can result in explosions and burn injuries. Previous attempts to quantify these events has been limited to compilations of case studies, federal agency reports and media reports. Although e-cigarette explosions and burn injuries are thought to be rare, current surveillance methods likely underestimate actual occurrences. Methods: Analyses were conducted on cross-sectional data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). A keyword search of case narrative text was used to identify e-cigarette-related explosion and burn injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2015 to 2017. Sampling weights were applied to make conservative national incidence estimates. Results: From 2015 to 2017, there were an estimated 2035 e-cigarette explosion and burn injuries presenting to US hospital emergency departments (95% CI 1107 to 2964). Conclusions: There are more e-cigarette explosion and burn injuries in the USA than estimated in the past reports. Improved surveillance of e-cigarette injuries and regulation of e-cigarette devices is urgently needed. NEISS could be a valuable resource for e-cigarette injury surveillance.

Original languageEnglish
JournalTobacco Control
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Explosions
Hospital Emergency Service
electronics
Wounds and Injuries
surveillance
Consumer Product Safety
Electronic Cigarettes
Hospital Departments
incidence
Weights and Measures
Equipment and Supplies
regulation
narrative
Incidence

Keywords

  • electronic nicotine delivery devices
  • public policy
  • surveillance and monitoring

Cite this

Rossheim, Matthew E. ; Livingston, Melvin D. ; Soule, Eric K. ; Zeraye, Helen A. ; Thombs, Dennis L. / Electronic cigarette explosion and burn injuries, US Emergency Departments 2015-2017. In: Tobacco Control. 2018.
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abstract = "Background: Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) battery failure can result in explosions and burn injuries. Previous attempts to quantify these events has been limited to compilations of case studies, federal agency reports and media reports. Although e-cigarette explosions and burn injuries are thought to be rare, current surveillance methods likely underestimate actual occurrences. Methods: Analyses were conducted on cross-sectional data from the US Consumer Product Safety Commission's (CPSC) National Electronic Injury Surveillance System (NEISS). A keyword search of case narrative text was used to identify e-cigarette-related explosion and burn injuries presenting to US emergency departments from 2015 to 2017. Sampling weights were applied to make conservative national incidence estimates. Results: From 2015 to 2017, there were an estimated 2035 e-cigarette explosion and burn injuries presenting to US hospital emergency departments (95{\%} CI 1107 to 2964). Conclusions: There are more e-cigarette explosion and burn injuries in the USA than estimated in the past reports. Improved surveillance of e-cigarette injuries and regulation of e-cigarette devices is urgently needed. NEISS could be a valuable resource for e-cigarette injury surveillance.",
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Electronic cigarette explosion and burn injuries, US Emergency Departments 2015-2017. / Rossheim, Matthew E.; Livingston, Melvin D.; Soule, Eric K.; Zeraye, Helen A.; Thombs, Dennis L.

In: Tobacco Control, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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