Effects of resynchronization therapy on sympathetic activity in patients with depressed ejection fraction and intraventricular conduction delay due to ischemic or idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy

Mohamed H. Hamdan, Saverio Barbera, Robert C. Kowal, Richard L. Page, Karthik Ramaswamy, Jose A. Joglar, Valeh Karimkhani, Michael L. Smith

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54 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study assesses the effect of biventricular pacing on sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in patients with depressed ejection fraction and intraventricular conduction delay (IVCD). Biventricular pacing has been shown to result in hemodynamic improvement in patients with depressed ejection fraction and IVCD. The effect of biventricular pacing on SNA, however, remains unclear. A total of 15 men with a mean ejection fraction of 25 ± 4% were enrolled. Arterial pressure, central venous pressure and SNA were recorded during 3 minutes of right atrial (RA) pacing and RA-biventricular pacing. Pacing was performed at a rate 5 to 10 beats faster than sinus rhythm, with an atrioventricular interval equal to 100 ms during RA-biventricular pacing. RA-biventricular pacing resulted in greater arterial pressures (p <0.05) than RA pacing (146 ± 15/83 ± 11 vs 141 ± 15/80 ± 10 mm Hg). There were no differences in central venous pressures between the 2 pacing modes (p = 0.76). SNA was significantly less during RA-biventricular pacing (727 ± 242 U) than during RA pacing (833 ± 332 U) (p <0.02). Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between baseline QRS duration and the decrease in SNA noted with RA-biventricular pacing (r = 0.58, p = 0.03). Biventricular pacing results in improved hemodynamics and a decrease in SNA compared with intrinsic conduction in patients with left ventricular dysfunction and IVCD. If the current findings are also present with chronic biventricular pacing, then this form of therapy may have a positive impact on mortality.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1047-1051
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume89
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 May 2002

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