Effects of prolonged standing on gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy

Yasser Salem, Venita Lovelace-Chandler, Reta J. Zabel, Amy Gross McMillan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD 2.5, range 4.09.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During phase A, the children received their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase B, children received the prolonged standing program three times per week, in addition to their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase A2, children received their usual physical therapy treatment. Gait analysis and clinical assessment of spasticity were performed before and after each phase. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements was used to test for changes in gait measures across the four measurement sessions. Friedman's was used to test for changes in muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) across the four measurement sessions. Stride length (p <.001), gait speed (p <.001), stride time (p <.001), stance phase time (p <.001), double support time (p <.003), muscle tone (p <.02), and peak dorsiflexion angle during midstance (p <.004) improved significantly following the intervention phase. The results of this study demonstrate that the gait pattern of children with cerebral palsy classified as level II or III on the Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) improved by a prolonged standing program. However, these improvements were not maintained at 3 weeks. Further research is necessary with larger sample sizes to replicate these findings and determine specific "dosing" for standing programs to create long-lasting functional effects on gait.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-65
Number of pages12
JournalPhysical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 8 Mar 2010

Fingerprint

Cerebral Palsy
Gait
Therapeutics
Muscles
varespladib methyl
Sample Size
Analysis of Variance
Research

Keywords

  • Cerebral palsy
  • Gait
  • Standing program

Cite this

Salem, Yasser ; Lovelace-Chandler, Venita ; Zabel, Reta J. ; McMillan, Amy Gross. / Effects of prolonged standing on gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy. In: Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics. 2010 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 54-65.
@article{d945a68adac249e8836b63665bc83285,
title = "Effects of prolonged standing on gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD 2.5, range 4.09.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During phase A, the children received their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase B, children received the prolonged standing program three times per week, in addition to their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase A2, children received their usual physical therapy treatment. Gait analysis and clinical assessment of spasticity were performed before and after each phase. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements was used to test for changes in gait measures across the four measurement sessions. Friedman's was used to test for changes in muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) across the four measurement sessions. Stride length (p <.001), gait speed (p <.001), stride time (p <.001), stance phase time (p <.001), double support time (p <.003), muscle tone (p <.02), and peak dorsiflexion angle during midstance (p <.004) improved significantly following the intervention phase. The results of this study demonstrate that the gait pattern of children with cerebral palsy classified as level II or III on the Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) improved by a prolonged standing program. However, these improvements were not maintained at 3 weeks. Further research is necessary with larger sample sizes to replicate these findings and determine specific {"}dosing{"} for standing programs to create long-lasting functional effects on gait.",
keywords = "Cerebral palsy, Gait, Standing program",
author = "Yasser Salem and Venita Lovelace-Chandler and Zabel, {Reta J.} and McMillan, {Amy Gross}",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
day = "8",
doi = "10.3109/01942630903297177",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "54--65",
journal = "Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics",
issn = "0194-2638",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "1",

}

Effects of prolonged standing on gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy. / Salem, Yasser; Lovelace-Chandler, Venita; Zabel, Reta J.; McMillan, Amy Gross.

In: Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics, Vol. 30, No. 1, 08.03.2010, p. 54-65.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of prolonged standing on gait in children with spastic cerebral palsy

AU - Salem, Yasser

AU - Lovelace-Chandler, Venita

AU - Zabel, Reta J.

AU - McMillan, Amy Gross

PY - 2010/3/8

Y1 - 2010/3/8

N2 - The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD 2.5, range 4.09.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During phase A, the children received their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase B, children received the prolonged standing program three times per week, in addition to their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase A2, children received their usual physical therapy treatment. Gait analysis and clinical assessment of spasticity were performed before and after each phase. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements was used to test for changes in gait measures across the four measurement sessions. Friedman's was used to test for changes in muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) across the four measurement sessions. Stride length (p <.001), gait speed (p <.001), stride time (p <.001), stance phase time (p <.001), double support time (p <.003), muscle tone (p <.02), and peak dorsiflexion angle during midstance (p <.004) improved significantly following the intervention phase. The results of this study demonstrate that the gait pattern of children with cerebral palsy classified as level II or III on the Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) improved by a prolonged standing program. However, these improvements were not maintained at 3 weeks. Further research is necessary with larger sample sizes to replicate these findings and determine specific "dosing" for standing programs to create long-lasting functional effects on gait.

AB - The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of prolonged standing on gait characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy. Six children with spastic cerebral palsy participated in this study with an average age of 6.5 years (SD 2.5, range 4.09.8 years). A reverse baseline design (A-B-A) was used over a 9-week period. During phase A, the children received their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase B, children received the prolonged standing program three times per week, in addition to their usual physical therapy treatment. During phase A2, children received their usual physical therapy treatment. Gait analysis and clinical assessment of spasticity were performed before and after each phase. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) for repeated measurements was used to test for changes in gait measures across the four measurement sessions. Friedman's was used to test for changes in muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale) across the four measurement sessions. Stride length (p <.001), gait speed (p <.001), stride time (p <.001), stance phase time (p <.001), double support time (p <.003), muscle tone (p <.02), and peak dorsiflexion angle during midstance (p <.004) improved significantly following the intervention phase. The results of this study demonstrate that the gait pattern of children with cerebral palsy classified as level II or III on the Gross Motor Functional Classification System (GMFCS) improved by a prolonged standing program. However, these improvements were not maintained at 3 weeks. Further research is necessary with larger sample sizes to replicate these findings and determine specific "dosing" for standing programs to create long-lasting functional effects on gait.

KW - Cerebral palsy

KW - Gait

KW - Standing program

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77649161695&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3109/01942630903297177

DO - 10.3109/01942630903297177

M3 - Article

C2 - 20170432

AN - SCOPUS:77649161695

VL - 30

SP - 54

EP - 65

JO - Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics

JF - Physical and Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics

SN - 0194-2638

IS - 1

ER -