Effects of a social norm feedback campaign on the drinking norms and behavior of division I student-athletes

Dennis L. Thombs, Monair J. Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social norm feedback is a promising strategy for reducing alcohol misuse on college campuses. However, little is known about the impact of these interventions on at-risk populations, such as student-athletes. This study examined the effects of a campus-wide media campaign on Division I student-athletes at three universities. A discriminant function analysis revealed that a composite measure of perceived campus drinking norms distinguished between two campaign exposure groups. With the exception of one perceived norm measure (closest friends), the campaign-exposed group reported more conservative estimates of alcohol use in peers. However, there was no evidence that the campaign had reduced alcohol use. The inability of the campaign to reduce perceptions of alcohol use among one's closest friends may have accounted for the lack of change in drinking behavior. Discussion is directed to the potential limitations of using social norm feedback campaigns to reduce alcohol misuse in high-risk groups, such as student-athletes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-244
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Drug Education
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 12 Oct 2002

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