Early career biomedical grantsmanship self-efficacy

validation of an abbreviated self-assessment tool

Eileen M. Harwood, Amy R. Jones, Darin Erickson, Dedra Buchwald, Japera Johnson-Hemming, Harlan Jones, Spero Manson, Richard McGee, Ann Smith, Clifford J. Steer, Jamboor K. Vishwanatha, Anne M. Weber-Main, Kolawole S. Okuyemi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A hallmark of success for early career biomedical researchers is the acquisition of research funding. There are marked disparities among principal investigators who submit grants and the likelihood of receiving national funding. The National Research Mentoring Network was funded by the National Institutes of Health to diversify the biomedical research workforce and included grantsmanship training for early career researchers. Self-efficacy in developing research grant applications is significantly improved over time with training and experience. We created a 19-item self-efficacy assessment inventory. Our aims were to confirm the internal consistency of a three-factor solution for grantsmanship confidence and to test the likelihood that self-efficacy influences grant proposal submission timing. We gathered data from 190 diverse biomedical trainees who completed NRMN grantsmanship training between August 2015 and June 2017. Findings revealed high internal consistency for items in each of three factors. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy mean scores and grant submission timing predicting that, for every one-point increase in the mean score, the odds of submitting a grant 6 months post-training increased by 69%. An abbreviated inventory of grantsmanship skills self-efficacy is a promising tool for monitoring changes over time in early career researchers and for promoting tailored grantsmanship interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-26
Number of pages10
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1445
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2019

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Self Efficacy
Organized Financing
Research Personnel
Research
Equipment and Supplies
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Health
Biomedical Research
Self-Assessment
Self-assessment
Assessment Tools
Self-efficacy
Monitoring

Keywords

  • research grantsmanship
  • research workforce diversity
  • self-efficacy assessments
  • the U.S. National Research Mentoring Network

Cite this

Harwood, E. M., Jones, A. R., Erickson, D., Buchwald, D., Johnson-Hemming, J., Jones, H., ... Okuyemi, K. S. (2019). Early career biomedical grantsmanship self-efficacy: validation of an abbreviated self-assessment tool. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1445(1), 17-26. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13995
Harwood, Eileen M. ; Jones, Amy R. ; Erickson, Darin ; Buchwald, Dedra ; Johnson-Hemming, Japera ; Jones, Harlan ; Manson, Spero ; McGee, Richard ; Smith, Ann ; Steer, Clifford J. ; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K. ; Weber-Main, Anne M. ; Okuyemi, Kolawole S. / Early career biomedical grantsmanship self-efficacy : validation of an abbreviated self-assessment tool. In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences. 2019 ; Vol. 1445, No. 1. pp. 17-26.
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abstract = "A hallmark of success for early career biomedical researchers is the acquisition of research funding. There are marked disparities among principal investigators who submit grants and the likelihood of receiving national funding. The National Research Mentoring Network was funded by the National Institutes of Health to diversify the biomedical research workforce and included grantsmanship training for early career researchers. Self-efficacy in developing research grant applications is significantly improved over time with training and experience. We created a 19-item self-efficacy assessment inventory. Our aims were to confirm the internal consistency of a three-factor solution for grantsmanship confidence and to test the likelihood that self-efficacy influences grant proposal submission timing. We gathered data from 190 diverse biomedical trainees who completed NRMN grantsmanship training between August 2015 and June 2017. Findings revealed high internal consistency for items in each of three factors. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy mean scores and grant submission timing predicting that, for every one-point increase in the mean score, the odds of submitting a grant 6 months post-training increased by 69{\%}. An abbreviated inventory of grantsmanship skills self-efficacy is a promising tool for monitoring changes over time in early career researchers and for promoting tailored grantsmanship interventions.",
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Harwood, EM, Jones, AR, Erickson, D, Buchwald, D, Johnson-Hemming, J, Jones, H, Manson, S, McGee, R, Smith, A, Steer, CJ, Vishwanatha, JK, Weber-Main, AM & Okuyemi, KS 2019, 'Early career biomedical grantsmanship self-efficacy: validation of an abbreviated self-assessment tool', Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, vol. 1445, no. 1, pp. 17-26. https://doi.org/10.1111/nyas.13995

Early career biomedical grantsmanship self-efficacy : validation of an abbreviated self-assessment tool. / Harwood, Eileen M.; Jones, Amy R.; Erickson, Darin; Buchwald, Dedra; Johnson-Hemming, Japera; Jones, Harlan; Manson, Spero; McGee, Richard; Smith, Ann; Steer, Clifford J.; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.; Weber-Main, Anne M.; Okuyemi, Kolawole S.

In: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Vol. 1445, No. 1, 01.06.2019, p. 17-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Early career biomedical grantsmanship self-efficacy

T2 - validation of an abbreviated self-assessment tool

AU - Harwood, Eileen M.

AU - Jones, Amy R.

AU - Erickson, Darin

AU - Buchwald, Dedra

AU - Johnson-Hemming, Japera

AU - Jones, Harlan

AU - Manson, Spero

AU - McGee, Richard

AU - Smith, Ann

AU - Steer, Clifford J.

AU - Vishwanatha, Jamboor K.

AU - Weber-Main, Anne M.

AU - Okuyemi, Kolawole S.

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - A hallmark of success for early career biomedical researchers is the acquisition of research funding. There are marked disparities among principal investigators who submit grants and the likelihood of receiving national funding. The National Research Mentoring Network was funded by the National Institutes of Health to diversify the biomedical research workforce and included grantsmanship training for early career researchers. Self-efficacy in developing research grant applications is significantly improved over time with training and experience. We created a 19-item self-efficacy assessment inventory. Our aims were to confirm the internal consistency of a three-factor solution for grantsmanship confidence and to test the likelihood that self-efficacy influences grant proposal submission timing. We gathered data from 190 diverse biomedical trainees who completed NRMN grantsmanship training between August 2015 and June 2017. Findings revealed high internal consistency for items in each of three factors. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy mean scores and grant submission timing predicting that, for every one-point increase in the mean score, the odds of submitting a grant 6 months post-training increased by 69%. An abbreviated inventory of grantsmanship skills self-efficacy is a promising tool for monitoring changes over time in early career researchers and for promoting tailored grantsmanship interventions.

AB - A hallmark of success for early career biomedical researchers is the acquisition of research funding. There are marked disparities among principal investigators who submit grants and the likelihood of receiving national funding. The National Research Mentoring Network was funded by the National Institutes of Health to diversify the biomedical research workforce and included grantsmanship training for early career researchers. Self-efficacy in developing research grant applications is significantly improved over time with training and experience. We created a 19-item self-efficacy assessment inventory. Our aims were to confirm the internal consistency of a three-factor solution for grantsmanship confidence and to test the likelihood that self-efficacy influences grant proposal submission timing. We gathered data from 190 diverse biomedical trainees who completed NRMN grantsmanship training between August 2015 and June 2017. Findings revealed high internal consistency for items in each of three factors. There was a statistically significant association between self-efficacy mean scores and grant submission timing predicting that, for every one-point increase in the mean score, the odds of submitting a grant 6 months post-training increased by 69%. An abbreviated inventory of grantsmanship skills self-efficacy is a promising tool for monitoring changes over time in early career researchers and for promoting tailored grantsmanship interventions.

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KW - research workforce diversity

KW - self-efficacy assessments

KW - the U.S. National Research Mentoring Network

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U2 - 10.1111/nyas.13995

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