Drug Enforcement Administration Rescheduling of Hydrocodone Combination Products Is Associated With Changes in Physician Pain Management Prescribing Preferences

Marc L. Fleming, Larry Driver, Sujit S. Sansgiry, Susan M. Abughosh, Matthew A. Wanat, Tyler J. Varisco, Todd Pickard, Kathleen Reeve, Knox H. Todd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Due to rising misuse, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) moved hydrocodone combination products (HCPs) from DEA Schedule III to DEA Schedule II in October 2014. Aside from increasing regulatory scrutiny, rescheduling may have increased the administrative burden surrounding HCP prescribing. This study explored how HCP rescheduling and associated administrative barriers may have affected physician treatment of acute (aNCP) and chronic (cNCP) noncancer pain. To this end, physician members of the Texas Medical Association completed a self-administered online questionnaire. Pharmacotherapy treatment plan was measured with two questions asking physicians whether they were more likely to recommend HCPs, acetaminophen/codeine (APAP/codeine), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), tramadol, or other agents for the treatment of aNCP and cNCP. Two Likert-scaled items were used to assess administrative burden. In total, 1365 physicians responded (response rate = 15.39%). Physicians more frequently selected APAP/codeine (37%) for aNCP and tramadol (44%) for cNCP. A majority (78.8%) of physicians agreed that rescheduling led to modified prescribing, and those in agreement were significantly less likely than those who disagreed to prescribe HCPs for aNCP (24.2% vs. 56.4%; χ2 = 68.6, P <.001) and cNCP (16.9% vs. 37%; χ2 = 36.1, P <.001). Rescheduling and associated administrative burden are both associated with modified physician HCP prescribing in both aNCP and cNCP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-31
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy
Volume33
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Apr 2019

Fingerprint

Hydrocodone
Pain Management
Physicians
Drug Administration Schedule
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Tramadol
Codeine
Acetaminophen
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Therapeutics
Drug Therapy
Pain

Keywords

  • Hydrocodone
  • opioid
  • opioid use disorder
  • pain management
  • prescription drug abuse
  • rescheduling
  • substance use disorder

Cite this

Fleming, Marc L. ; Driver, Larry ; Sansgiry, Sujit S. ; Abughosh, Susan M. ; Wanat, Matthew A. ; Varisco, Tyler J. ; Pickard, Todd ; Reeve, Kathleen ; Todd, Knox H. / Drug Enforcement Administration Rescheduling of Hydrocodone Combination Products Is Associated With Changes in Physician Pain Management Prescribing Preferences. In: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy. 2019 ; Vol. 33, No. 1-2. pp. 22-31.
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abstract = "Due to rising misuse, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) moved hydrocodone combination products (HCPs) from DEA Schedule III to DEA Schedule II in October 2014. Aside from increasing regulatory scrutiny, rescheduling may have increased the administrative burden surrounding HCP prescribing. This study explored how HCP rescheduling and associated administrative barriers may have affected physician treatment of acute (aNCP) and chronic (cNCP) noncancer pain. To this end, physician members of the Texas Medical Association completed a self-administered online questionnaire. Pharmacotherapy treatment plan was measured with two questions asking physicians whether they were more likely to recommend HCPs, acetaminophen/codeine (APAP/codeine), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), tramadol, or other agents for the treatment of aNCP and cNCP. Two Likert-scaled items were used to assess administrative burden. In total, 1365 physicians responded (response rate = 15.39{\%}). Physicians more frequently selected APAP/codeine (37{\%}) for aNCP and tramadol (44{\%}) for cNCP. A majority (78.8{\%}) of physicians agreed that rescheduling led to modified prescribing, and those in agreement were significantly less likely than those who disagreed to prescribe HCPs for aNCP (24.2{\%} vs. 56.4{\%}; χ2 = 68.6, P <.001) and cNCP (16.9{\%} vs. 37{\%}; χ2 = 36.1, P <.001). Rescheduling and associated administrative burden are both associated with modified physician HCP prescribing in both aNCP and cNCP.",
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Drug Enforcement Administration Rescheduling of Hydrocodone Combination Products Is Associated With Changes in Physician Pain Management Prescribing Preferences. / Fleming, Marc L.; Driver, Larry; Sansgiry, Sujit S.; Abughosh, Susan M.; Wanat, Matthew A.; Varisco, Tyler J.; Pickard, Todd; Reeve, Kathleen; Todd, Knox H.

In: Journal of Pain and Palliative Care Pharmacotherapy, Vol. 33, No. 1-2, 03.04.2019, p. 22-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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