Do Brief Personalized Feedback Interventions Work for Mandated Students or Is It Just Getting Caught That Works?

Helene Raskin White, Eun-Young Mun, Thomas J. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies evaluating the efficacy of brief interventions with mandated college students have reported declines in drinking from baseline to short-term follow-up regardless of intervention condition. A key question is whether these observed changes are due to the intervention or to the incident and/or reprimand. This study evaluates a brief personalized feedback intervention (PFI) for students (N = 230) who were referred to a student assistance program because of infractions of university rules regarding substance use to determine whether observed changes in substance use are attributable to the intervention. Half the students received immediate feedback (at baseline and after the 2-month follow-up), and half received delayed feedback (only after the 2-month follow-up). Students in both conditions generally reduced their drinking and alcohol-related problems from baseline to the 2-month follow-up and from the 2-month to the 7-month follow-up; however, there were no significant between-group differences at either follow-up. Therefore, it appears that the incident and/or reprimand are important instigators of mandated student change and that written PFIs do not enhance these effects on a short-term basis but may on a longer term basis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)107-116
Number of pages10
JournalPsychology of Addictive Behaviors
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Mar 2008

Fingerprint

Students
Alcohol Drinking
Drinking

Keywords

  • alcohol
  • brief interventions
  • college students
  • drugs
  • mandated students

Cite this

@article{182b9a33815b4ecdba4a2dea5cf2aee7,
title = "Do Brief Personalized Feedback Interventions Work for Mandated Students or Is It Just Getting Caught That Works?",
abstract = "Studies evaluating the efficacy of brief interventions with mandated college students have reported declines in drinking from baseline to short-term follow-up regardless of intervention condition. A key question is whether these observed changes are due to the intervention or to the incident and/or reprimand. This study evaluates a brief personalized feedback intervention (PFI) for students (N = 230) who were referred to a student assistance program because of infractions of university rules regarding substance use to determine whether observed changes in substance use are attributable to the intervention. Half the students received immediate feedback (at baseline and after the 2-month follow-up), and half received delayed feedback (only after the 2-month follow-up). Students in both conditions generally reduced their drinking and alcohol-related problems from baseline to the 2-month follow-up and from the 2-month to the 7-month follow-up; however, there were no significant between-group differences at either follow-up. Therefore, it appears that the incident and/or reprimand are important instigators of mandated student change and that written PFIs do not enhance these effects on a short-term basis but may on a longer term basis.",
keywords = "alcohol, brief interventions, college students, drugs, mandated students",
author = "White, {Helene Raskin} and Eun-Young Mun and Morgan, {Thomas J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/0893-164X.22.1.107",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "107--116",
journal = "Psychology of Addictive Behaviors",
issn = "0893-164X",
publisher = "Educational Publishing Foundation",
number = "1",

}

Do Brief Personalized Feedback Interventions Work for Mandated Students or Is It Just Getting Caught That Works? / White, Helene Raskin; Mun, Eun-Young; Morgan, Thomas J.

In: Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 22, No. 1, 01.03.2008, p. 107-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do Brief Personalized Feedback Interventions Work for Mandated Students or Is It Just Getting Caught That Works?

AU - White, Helene Raskin

AU - Mun, Eun-Young

AU - Morgan, Thomas J.

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - Studies evaluating the efficacy of brief interventions with mandated college students have reported declines in drinking from baseline to short-term follow-up regardless of intervention condition. A key question is whether these observed changes are due to the intervention or to the incident and/or reprimand. This study evaluates a brief personalized feedback intervention (PFI) for students (N = 230) who were referred to a student assistance program because of infractions of university rules regarding substance use to determine whether observed changes in substance use are attributable to the intervention. Half the students received immediate feedback (at baseline and after the 2-month follow-up), and half received delayed feedback (only after the 2-month follow-up). Students in both conditions generally reduced their drinking and alcohol-related problems from baseline to the 2-month follow-up and from the 2-month to the 7-month follow-up; however, there were no significant between-group differences at either follow-up. Therefore, it appears that the incident and/or reprimand are important instigators of mandated student change and that written PFIs do not enhance these effects on a short-term basis but may on a longer term basis.

AB - Studies evaluating the efficacy of brief interventions with mandated college students have reported declines in drinking from baseline to short-term follow-up regardless of intervention condition. A key question is whether these observed changes are due to the intervention or to the incident and/or reprimand. This study evaluates a brief personalized feedback intervention (PFI) for students (N = 230) who were referred to a student assistance program because of infractions of university rules regarding substance use to determine whether observed changes in substance use are attributable to the intervention. Half the students received immediate feedback (at baseline and after the 2-month follow-up), and half received delayed feedback (only after the 2-month follow-up). Students in both conditions generally reduced their drinking and alcohol-related problems from baseline to the 2-month follow-up and from the 2-month to the 7-month follow-up; however, there were no significant between-group differences at either follow-up. Therefore, it appears that the incident and/or reprimand are important instigators of mandated student change and that written PFIs do not enhance these effects on a short-term basis but may on a longer term basis.

KW - alcohol

KW - brief interventions

KW - college students

KW - drugs

KW - mandated students

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=40749086250&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/0893-164X.22.1.107

DO - 10.1037/0893-164X.22.1.107

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 107

EP - 116

JO - Psychology of Addictive Behaviors

JF - Psychology of Addictive Behaviors

SN - 0893-164X

IS - 1

ER -