Depression treatment and health-related quality of life among adults with diabetes and depression

Ebtihag O. Alenzi, Usha Sambamoorthi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Previous findings regarding depression treatment and its consequences on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of adults with diabetes were inconsistent and targeted certain groups of population. Therefore, there is a critical need to conduct a population-based study that focuses on a general population with diabetes and depression. Objective: The primary aim of this study was to examine the physical and mental HRQoL associated with depression treatment during the follow-up year. Methods: We adopted a longitudinal design using multiple panels (2005–2011) of the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to create a baseline year and follow-up year. We included adults with diabetes and depression. We categorized the baseline depression treatment into: (1) antidepressant use only; (2) psychotherapy with or without antidepressants; and (3) no treatment. HRQOL was measured using SF-12 version 2 physical component summary (PCS) and SF-12 mental component summary (MCS) scores during both baseline year and follow-up year. Ordinary least squares (OLS) were used to estimate the association between depression treatment and the HRQoL measures. The OLS regression controlled for predisposing, enabling, need, external environment factors, personal health practices, and baseline HRQoL measures. Results: After controlling for all the independent variables and the baseline PCS, individuals who received psychotherapy with or without antidepressants had higher PCS scores as compared to those without any treatment for depression (beta = 1.28, p < 0.001). Individuals who reported using only antidepressants had lower PCS scores (beta = −0.54, p < 0.001) as compared to those without depression treatment. On the contrary, individuals who reported receiving psychotherapy with or without antidepressants had lower MCS scores as compared to those without depression treatment (beta = −1.43, p < 0.001). Those using only antidepressants had higher MCS scores as compared to those without depression treatment (beta = 0.56, p < 0.001). Conclusion: The associations between depression treatment and the HRQoL varied by the type of depression treatment and the component of the HRQoL measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1517-1525
Number of pages9
JournalQuality of Life Research
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Adults MEPS
  • Antidepressants
  • Depression
  • Diabetes
  • HRQoL
  • Psychotherapy

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