Decision support needs for shared clinical decision-making regarding HPV vaccination among adults 27–45 years of age

Christopher W. Wheldon, Ashvita Garg, Annalynn M. Galvin, Jonathan D. Moore, Erika L. Thompson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Identify HPV information needs and shared clinical decision-making preferences among adults 27–45 and describe differences in needs and preferences among underserved and vulnerable populations. Methods: Participants 27–45 years old with no history of HPV vaccination completed a cross-sectional web-based survey between April-May 2020 (N = 702). Preferred role in shared clinical decision making was described across demographic groups and sociodemographic correlates of HPV vaccine information needs. Results: Most (77.6%) reported a preference to make a medical decision on their own or after consulting with a healthcare provider, while the remaining respondents preferred to make a joint decision (17.0%) or for their doctor to make the decision (5.4%). Over 80% needed more information about safety, effectiveness, personal benefit, provider recommendation, side effects, and risks. Education was the strongest demographic factors associated with higher information needs (p<0.05). Conclusion: The majority of individuals across demographic groups were individually focused with regard to their healthcare decisions and wanted more information about HPV vaccine safety, side effects, and risks, in addition to personalized information about benefits from HPV vaccination. Practical implications: Patient-centered interventions are needed to engage adults in shared decision-making regarding HPV vaccination.

Original languageEnglish
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • Age factors
  • Humans
  • Papillomavirus vaccines
  • Patient acceptance of health care
  • Surveys and questionnaires

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