Consumers' preference and willingness to pay for pharmacist counselling for non‐prescription medicines

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Abstract

Pharmacist counselling for non‐prescription medicine purchases is one way of ensuring that these medicines are used in a safe and effective manner. Data collected as part of a larger study of information sources on non‐prescription medicines were used to determine consumers' preference for pharmacist counselling for non‐prescription medicine purchases, their willingness to pay for the service, and the amount they were willing to pay. A total of 458 (15‐2%) consumers from six contiguous states in the U.S.A. responded to the mailed questionnaire. Of the consumers who responded, 63‐4% indicated a preference for such a counselling service and, of these consumers, 20‐4% indicated a willingness to pay for the service. Of the consumers who indicated a willingness to pay for pharmacist counselling for non‐prescription medicines, 56‐5% were willing to pay between 50 cents and $1.50, 28‐2% between $1.51 and $3, and about 15‐3% were willing to pay more than $3. Significant differences were noted in consumers' preference for pharmacist counselling when compared on the basis of certain consumer characteristics. Consumers who indicated a preference for pharmacist counselling for non‐prescription medicines showed a significantly higher involvement in non‐prescription medicine purchase decision, perceived pharmacists to be more credible, and indicated more favourable previous encounters with pharmacists than consumers who did not prefer pharmacist counselling. Consumers who consulted pharmacists and usually accepted their recommendations were also more likely to prefer pharmacist counselling for non‐prescription medicines.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)17-25
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 1994

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