Comparison of the therapeutic effects of human and mouse adipose-derived stem cells in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury

Shijia Zhang, Svitlana D. Danchuk, Kathleen Mp Imhof, Julie A. Semon, Brittni A. Scruggs, Ryan W. Bonvillain, Amy L. Strong, Jeffrey M. Gimble, Aline M. Betancourt, Deborah E. Sullivan, Bruce A. Bunnell

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37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction. Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have emerged as important regulators of inflammatory/immune responses in vitro and in vivo and represent attractive candidates for cell-based therapies for diseases that involve excessive inflammation. Acute lung injury (ALI) is an inflammatory condition for which treatment is mainly supportive due to lack of effective therapies. In this study, the therapeutic effects of ASC-based therapy were assessed in vivo by comparison of the anti-inflammatory properties of both human and murine ASCs in a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI. Methods. Human ASCs (hASCs) or mouse ASCs (mASCs) were delivered to C57Bl/6 mice (7.5 × 10§ssup§5 §esup§total cells/mouse) by oropharyngeal aspiration (OA) four hours after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (15 mg/kg). Mice were sacrificed 24 and 72 hours after LPS exposure, and lung histology examined for evaluation of inflammation and injury. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was analyzed to determine total and differential cell counts, total protein and albumin concentrations, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. Cytokine expression in the injured lungs was measured at the steady-state mRNA levels and protein levels for assessment of the degree of lung inflammation. Results: Both human and mouse ASC treatments provided protective anti-inflammatory responses. There were decreased levels of leukocyte (for example neutrophil) migration into the alveoli, total protein and albumin concentrations in BALF, and MPO activity after the induction of ALI following both therapies. Additionally, cell therapy with both cell types effectively suppressed the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and increased the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10). Overall, the syngeneic mASC therapy had a more potent therapeutic effect than the xenogeneic hASC therapy in this model. Conclusions: Treatment with hASCs or mASCs significantly attenuated LPS-induced acute lung injury in mice. These results suggest a potential benefit for using an ASC-based therapy to treat clinical ALI and may possibly prevent the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

Original languageEnglish
Article number13
JournalStem Cell Research and Therapy
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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    Zhang, S., Danchuk, S. D., Imhof, K. M., Semon, J. A., Scruggs, B. A., Bonvillain, R. W., Strong, A. L., Gimble, J. M., Betancourt, A. M., Sullivan, D. E., & Bunnell, B. A. (2013). Comparison of the therapeutic effects of human and mouse adipose-derived stem cells in a murine model of lipopolysaccharide-induced acute lung injury. Stem Cell Research and Therapy, 4(1), [13]. https://doi.org/10.1186/scrt161