Circadian phase preference in college students: Relationships with psychological functioning and academics

Daniel J. Taylor, Kendra C. Clay, Adam D. Bramoweth, Kevin Sethi, Brandy M. Roane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current study offers a comprehensive assessment of psychosocial functioning and academic performance in relation to circadian phase preference in a US sample of undergraduate college students (N=838), aged 17-26 (M=19.78, SD=1.89). Women had greater morning preference than men, and seniors had greater morning preference than freshmen. Circadian phase preference, fatigue, perceived stress, depression, anxiety, and substance use were assessed cross-sectionally and grade point average (GPA) was assessed prospectively. Evening phase preference was related to higher levels of fatigue, alcohol and caffeine use, and worse academic performance than morning or intermediate phase preferences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-547
Number of pages7
JournalChronobiology International
Volume28
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2011

Keywords

  • Academic
  • Alcohol
  • Chronotype
  • Circadian
  • College
  • Fatigue
  • Psychological
  • Sleep

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